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posted Jun 5, 2019

Health Benefits and Funding for Close-to-Home Recreational Trails

by Terry Bergerson with Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, Randall Rosengerger with Oregon State University - College of Forestry

Non-motorized trail access was identified as a cost-effective public health strategy for increasing physical activity levels in the Oregon population.


posted Jun 5, 2019

DIY Volunteer Program Assessment: Maximize and Sustain Your Volunteer Community

by Kendra Baumer with New York - New Jersey Trail Conference

Take control of your volunteer program's future!


posted Jun 5, 2019

Making it Count: Analyzing Trail Use Data in New York and Connecticut

by Laura Brown with University of Connecticut, Dylan Carey with Parks and Trails New York, Jennifer Ceponis with Capital District Transportation Committee, Emily Dozier with Dutchess County Transportation Council, Kristina Kelly with Connecticut Trail Census, James Stevens with ConsultEcon, Inc.

Presenters outline the techniques used and lessons learned from trail counts in New York and Connecticut.


posted Jun 5, 2019

Big City Trails: Planning for Forest Protection

by Mike Halferty with City of Toronto - Urban Foresty Branch

This poster session presentation summarizes the process of developing the City of Toronto's Natural Environment Trails Strategy and its outcomes.


posted Jun 5, 2019

The Long Trail Back: The National Forest System Trails Stewardship Act, Three Years On

by Deb Caffin with USDA Forest Service, Randy Rasmussen with Back Country Horsemen of America, Paul Sanford with The Wilderness Society, Randy Welsh with National Wilderness Stewardship Alliance

In this presentation the panelists discuss how the U.S. Forest Service is mandated to increase the role of volunteers and partners in trail maintenance activities.


posted Jun 5, 2019

Lessons Learned from Creative Problem-Solving

by Yves Zsutty with City of San Jose - Parks, Recreation, and Neighborhood Services

In this presentation find out what worked and what didn't with San Jose, California's urban trail network.


posted Jun 5, 2019

21st Century Way to Attract Trail Users: On-Line Trail Finder

by Lelia Mellen with National Park Service

Learn about the new Trail Finder online database!


posted Jun 4, 2019

How Two Communities are Creating and Attracting Residents to Unique Trail Experiences

by Ron L. Taylor with Taylor Siefker Williams Design Group, Travis Glazier with Onondaga County Office of Environment, Andre Denman with Indy Parks/Department of Public Works

This session provides two case studies of how communities are creating and attracting residents to unique experiences on their trail systems.


posted Jun 4, 2019

Planning and Building Trails in Under-Served Urban Communities with Multiple Partners

by Daniel Ashworth with Alta Planning + Design, Sara Patterson with Michael Baker International

Two case studies lay out the opportunities and challenges with completing trails through a lengthy planning, design, and construction process with multiple planning partners and project funders.


posted Jun 4, 2019

Trail Map “Do's and Dont's"

by Jeremy Apgar with New York - New Jersey Trail Conference

All trail users, from casual walkers to experienced mountain bikers or hikers, should have access to a good trail map to make the most of their outdoor experience.


posted Jun 4, 2019

Rails-with-Trails: Lessons Learned

by Jared Fijalkowski with Volpe National Transportation Systems Center, Eli Griffen with Rails to Trails Conservancy

This session demonstrates how communities can develop Rails-with-Trails that facilitate both rail and active transportation.


posted Jun 4, 2019

My Two Cents – Innovative Trail Funding Proposal for States and Localities

by Chris Gensic with City of Charlottesville Parks & Recreation

Lack of funding for trail design, construction, and upkeep is often a major barrier to implementation. Topics of discussion include: should this be local or state level, should it fund planning or construction, how much is enough but not too much, and how to equitably share the funding.