PTSD: Trails and Nature - The Better Medication

A TRAILSNext™presentation

Natural and holistic PTSD treatment protocols.

by Mike Buckley, Retired Colonel, Retired U.S. Army

Examining the benefit of trails and nature therapy as an alternative treatment to pharmaceutical drugs in helping with PTSD / Suicide Ideation / Mild & Moderate Depression.

Learning Objectives: Identify additional natural and holistic PTSD treatment protocols.

About the Author

Mike “Bloody Feet” Buckley, Colonel (Ret), U.S. Army. A veteran of thirty-two years of active duty, six deployments and three combat tours; COL Buckley’s experience includes time as an Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Battalion Commander in Afghanistan, a Base Commander in Iraq, Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Education at West Point, and as a U.S. Army War College Fellow in the Institute for National Security and Counterterrorism, Syracuse University. Education includes a M.S. in Kinesiology, a B.S. in Public Management and several national coaching certifications. He recently thru-hiked the Arizona Trail under the auspices of Warrior Expeditions and can often be found on a nearby trail or on his bike on a quiet country road. He currently resides in Cazenovia NY with his family.

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