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Trail-Specific Recommended Resources

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published Jun 2008

Are horses responsible for introducing non-native plants along forest trails in the eastern United States?

Horses have been suggested to be an important source for the introduction of non-native plant species along trails, but the conclusions were based on anecdotal evidence.


published May 2008

Best Practices of Accessibility in Parks and Recreation: A Delphi Survey of National Experts in Accessibility

by Alison Voight, Gary Robb, Jennifer Skulski, Deborah Getz, Debbie Scharven

As a result of frequent inquiries regarding best practices from practitioners, NCA initiated this research study in order to ascertain which practices in the field of parks and recreation accessibility management exceed the minimum standards set forth by the ADA and other disability-related legislation.


published Feb 2008

A Resident’s Guide for Creating Safe and Walkable Communities

by Federal Highway Administration

This guide provides examples from other communities working to improve pedestrian safety. It includes information, ideas, and resources to help residents learn about issues that affect walking conditions; find ways to address or prevent these problems; and promote pedestrian safety.


published Jan 2008

Emerging Trends in Pocket Bike Parks

A presentation exploring bike parks with pump-tracks, skills areas, dirt jumps and freeride areas.


published Oct 2007

"Defensive Horse Safety" Training Course

by American Trails Staff

A presentation on remaining safe while performing such tasks as catching, leading, tying, grooming, bridling, and saddling stock.


published Sep 2007

Historical and Interpretation Study, Trail of Tears National Historic Trail

by U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

The purpose of this study is to provide baseline historical information pertaining to those portions of the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail that cross onto lands managed by the FWS at the White River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arkansas, the Wheeler NWR in Alabama, and the Tennessee NWR in Tennessee.


published Sep 2007

Trail Intersection Design Guidelines

by Florida Department of Transportation

The growth in trails reflects many people’s enjoyment of physical separation from motorized traffic. Segregation allows trail users to avoid the pollution, noise, and intimidation they perceive from motor vehicles, and the potential for an injury producing crash.


published Sep 2007

Road and Trail Intersection Safety

by Parks and Trails New York

The time has come to learn more about the needs and behaviors of motorists and trail users and ensure that design guidelines and laws and policies governing road and trail intersections fully provide for the safety of this increasingly prevalent type of traffic junction. The purpose of this study is to examine the current state of practice of the design and management of intersections between trails and roadways, gather feedback on road and trail intersection crashes and complaints, raise public awareness of the issue of road and trail intersection safety, and offer policy and design recommendations that will improve the safety of road and trail intersections.


published Mar 2007

New England Greenway Vision Plan

The New England wide vision plan for a network of greenways and green spaces is built on the continuation of a great tradition of planning in New England.


published Mar 2007

Basic Elements of Trail Design and Trail Layout

by American Trails Staff

The goal of trail building is to create a long-term relationship between humans and nature.


published Mar 2007

Pathways to Trail Building

The intent of this 4th edition of a Tennessee Recreation Trails Manual is to help understand the dynamics of designing and building non-motorized trails.


published Jan 2007

Guide to Sustainable Mountain Trails

by National Park Service

This Guide to Sustainable Mountain Trails: Assessment, Planning & Design Sketchbook, 2007 Edition, has its roots in the foundational policies and ethics of federal conservation and preservation land management agencies such as the United States Forest Service and the National Park Service, and in the spirit of nonprofit agency partnership support for land management agency stewardship initiatives.