LandLine: A 1,400 Mile Trail and Greenway Plan for Metro Boston

A TRAILSNext™ presentation

Learn about how to evaluate an existing trail network to identify projects and opportunities to create a connected trail and greenway network in an urban area. 

by David Loutzenheiser, Senior Transportation Planner, Metropolitan Area Planning Council

The Boston region has an extensive collection of rail trails, river paths, and separated bike lanes, and more in planning and design. However we are far from a connected network. MAPC, the regional planning agency for Boston, has come up with a plan for a connected trail and greenway network. Branded LandLine, the network vision helps build partnerships at all levels of government to ensure coordination of greenway development and build support for completion. This presentation will describe the elements of the plan, accomplishments to date, and the future steps. The Plan is transportation focused with the goal of incorporating more active transportation trips throughout the region between work, home and leisure. https://www.mapc.org/transport...

Learning Objectives: Evaluate an existing trail network to identify projects and opportunities to create a connected trail and greenway network in an urban area.

About the Author

David Loutzenheiser has been with MAPC since 2008. He manages projects primarily in the area of bicycle transportation, walking, and related areas. Mr. Loutzenheiser champions a growing number of projects and plans to bring cycling and walking transportation into the forefront of sustainability in the region. He is currently working to develop a greenway system vision for the metro Boston region. He is developing bicycle and pedestrian plans for 12 municipalities within MAPC through the Sustainable Communities program. He is involved in several trail development projects, particularly the Aqueduct trail system, and other regional trail planning efforts. Mr. Loutzenheiser holds a Master’s Degree in Urban Planning from the University of Washington in Seattle, a Master of Science Degree in Civil Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley, and a B.S. in Civil Engineering from North Carolina State University.

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