filed under: federal legislation


Funding Needs For Wildlife, Working Lands, and Recreation In Montana

Is Montana doing enough to maintain its own outdoor heritage and build a legacy for future generations?

A study shows that from 2014 to 2018, there was a $6.8 million gap between trail projects proposed to RTP and funding awarded.

by American Trails Staff

Flathead River, Montana.


Montana Funding Outdoor Heritage 2019


A study by Headwaters Economics and the Montana Outdoor Heritage Project raises the question, "is Montana doing enough to maintain its own outdoor heritage and build a legacy for future generations?" Despite overwhelming support by Montanans for conservation and outdoor recreation, the State has unmet needs totaling millions of dollars per year in wildlife management, state parks, and trails. The study looks at lessons learned from other State's funding programs to propose strategies for Montana.

Published July 2019

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