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published Aug 2018

Planning Trails with Wildlife in Mind - Introduction

by American Trails Staff

This handbook will help trail planners and builders balance the benefits of creating trails and being stewards of nature, especially wildlife.


published Aug 2018

Federal Highway Administration Training Programs

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), part of the US Department of Transportation, provides expertise, resources, and information to improve the nation's highway system and its intermodal connections. The Federal-Aid Highway Program provides financial assistance to the States to construct and improve the National Highway System, other roads, bridges, and trails.


published Aug 2018

Signs and Etiquette for Shared-use Urban Trails

by Stuart Macdonald

Encouraging different types of users to share the trail is just as important on urban trails as it is on backcountry trails.


published Aug 2018

Power lines along trails

by Stuart Macdonald

Examples of electric transmission lines in shared utility corridors with trails, railtrails, and greenways.


published Jul 2018

Educating trail users: advice for planning interpretive trail signs and exhibits

by California State Parks, Statewide Trails Section

It’s up to you as a park steward to instill a sense of appreciation for the story that needs to be told – interpretive theme and messages of the trail must be well planned.


published May 2018

FAQ: Do you have any advice for developing a community nature trail?

by American Trails Staff

An ideal nature trail blends the beauty of the landscape with interpretive signage to offer an inspirational and educational resource to a community.


published May 2018

Land Ethics for Equestrian Trail Users

Increasing numbers of equestrians on public lands require more awareness of impacts.


published Apr 2018

Connecting Parkersburg to Pittsburgh by Rail-Trail: Bringing a world-class trail network to West Virginia

by Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC)

This study focuses on the segment of the P2P corridor that lies within the state of West Virginia, from Parkersburg to the West Virginia–Pennsylvania border, just north of Morgantown. The primary alignment of the P2P corridor utilizes existing rail-trails and unused or abandoned rail corridors, and was largely determined through the collaborative efforts of P2P corridor partners. The size and scope of this project produce inherent complexities that will take many partners—working in coordination over several years—to complete.


published Mar 2018

Case Studies in Realizing Co-Benefits of Multimodal Roadway Design and Gray and Green Infrastructure

by Federal Highway Administration

This document highlights case studies of projects that contribute to safe and connected pedestrian and bicycle networks in States and communities throughout the U.S., while at the same time providing resiliency and green infrastructure benefits that promote resiliency and relieve burdens on stormwater systems.


published Feb 2018

Guidebook for Measuring Multimodal Network Connectivity

by Federal Highway Administration

The Guidebook for Measuring Multimodal Network Connectivity is a guide for transportation planners and analysts on the application of analysis methods and measures to support transportation planning and programming decisions. It describes a five-step analysis process and numerous methods and measures to support a variety of planning decisions. It includes references and illustrations of current practices, including materials from five case studies conducted as part of the research process.


published Feb 2018

Sheepskin Trail Feasibility Study

by Gibson-Thomas Engineering

The Sheepskin Trail, a rail-trail project is a proposed 34 mile bicycle/pedestrian path that will extend from Dunbar Township to Point Marion Borough at the Pennsylvania/West Virginia state line. The intent of this study update is to utilize and update the 1999 Feasibility Study as necessary based on changes to the trail corridor that have occurred in the past 18 years.


published Jan 2018

How Accessible Recreation Facilities Benefit Everyone

by R. Brian Kermeen with USDA Forest Service

Like most areas managed by the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, the central Sierra Nevada has steep and mountainous terrain. Most of our facilities evolved over time or were designed 30 years ago with no consideration for the needs of persons with disabilities.