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published Feb 2018

Operations, Maintenance, and Stewardship 101

by Robert (Bob) Searns with Robert Searns and Associates, Inc.

It's not as glamorous as building the trail. There is no ribbon cutting for a maintenance program and seldom does upkeep win a national award. Yet, operations, maintenance, and stewardship are essential to the safe use, enjoyment, and long-term success of any trail.


published Jan 2019

Oregon Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Participation and Priorities

Spending by Oregon residents on OHV riding trips (local and distant, day and multi-day) was an estimated $100 million per year across the state. In turn, this expenditure contributed 869 jobs, $35 million in value added, and $23 million in labor income.


posted Jul 5, 2022

Oregon Trails 2015

The State of Oregon's statewide trail plan.


published Dec 1999

Oregon, California, Mormon Pioneer, and Pony Express National Historic Trails Comprehensive Management and Use Plan / Final Environmental Impact Statement

by National Park Service

This Comprehensive Management and Use Plan / Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Oregon, California, Mormon Pioneer, and Pony Express National Historic Trails is shaped, in part, by the planning requirements found in section 5(f) of the National Trails System Act. It focuses on the trails’ purpose and significance, issues and concerns related to current conditions along the trails, resource protection, visitor experience and use, and long-term administrative and management objectives. Elements of the proposed plan have been developed in cooperation with federal, state, and local agencies, as well as nonprofit trails organizations — the entities that form the core of any partnership for national historic trails.


published Aug 2010

Oregon, California, Mormon Pioneer, and Pony Express National Historic Trails Long-Range Interpretive Plan

by National Park Service

This plan provides broad-based policies, guidelines, and standards for administering the four trails to ensure the protection of trail resources, their interpretation, and their continued use. Subsequent planning efforts tier off of the Comprehensive Management and Use Plan and provide more detailed recommendations and guidance. Among the many recommendations in the Comprehensive Management and Use Plan is one calling for a trails-wide interpretive plan.


published Dec 2019

Organizational Development Skills and Competencies

by American Trails Staff

Specific skills used in development of organizations for trails and greenways work: creating and building a nonprofit organization; managing boards and staff; recruiting, training, and rewarding volunteers; managing finances and legal issues.


published Jun 2018

Outdoor Participation Report 2018

by Outdoor Foundation

A participant in outdoor recreation is defined as an individual who took part in one or more of 42 outdoor activities at least once during 2017.


published Oct 2017

Outdoor Recreation and Conservation Careers Toolkit

by Transforming Youth Outdoors (TYO), U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Choose your outdoor career path! Get started by asking yourself some very basic questions. Even though you might not be able to answer all of them, it is a good first step to narrow down what you really want to do. Ready? Let’s go!


published Jan 2019

Outdoor Recreation in Oregon: Responding to Demographic and Societal Change

by Oregon State Parks

The plan addresses five important demographic and societal changes facing outdoor recreation providers in the coming years including: 1. An aging population; 2. An increasingly diverse population; 3. Lack of youth engagement in outdoor recreation; 4. An underserved low-income population; and 5. The health benefits of physical activity.


published Sep 2018

Outdoor Recreation Satellite Account: Updated Statistics for 2012-2016

Updated statistics from the Outdoor Recreation Satellite Account (ORSA) released by the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) show that the outdoor recreation economy accounted for 2.2 percent ($412 billion) of current-dollar GDP in 2016 (table 2). In data produced for the first time, using inflation-adjusted (real) GDP, the outdoor recreation economy grew 1.7 percent in 2016, faster than the 1.6 percent growth for the overall U.S. economy (table 6). In addition, real gross output, compensation, and employment all grew faster in outdoor recreation than in the overall economy in 2016.


published Nov 2018

Outdoor-Industry Jobs

This study was intended to assess current—and projected—employment levels across these sectors with a particular focus on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) oriented occupations that require “mid-level” education and skills. This education includes post-high school training but stops short of a bachelor’s degree,3 opening the door to a greater number of students who are not focused exclusively on four-year degrees. The study was also designed to identify employer demand for occupations within these four sectors.


posted Jul 5, 2022

Over Under through Infrastructure Obstacles

Learn how a New York study of road and trail intersections generated policy and design recommendations and a public education campaign for trail users and motorists.