filed under: wildlife and environment


Geosynthetics for Trails in Wet Areas: 2008 Edition

By Steve Monlux, USFS R1 Engineering

Guidelines for use of Geosynthetic materials in trail construction.

2008 Edition

Geosynthetics are synthetic materials (usually made from synthetic polymers) used with soil or rock in many types of construction. Their use has grown significantly in road construction for the past 40 years, and in trail construction for the past 15 years.

Highlights:

  • Geosynthetic materials can help prevent trails from failing in wet areas.
  • The many types of geosynthetic materials perform three major functions: separation, reinforcement, and drainage.
  • This report provides information on the different types of geosynthetic materials, explains basic geosynthetic design concepts, and provides detailed product specifications and procurement sources.

View the Guide

Published May 01, 1995

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