Three Rivers Heritage Trail 2014 User Survey and Economic Impact Analysis

The 24-mile Three Rivers Heritage Trail extends along the banks of the Allegheny, Monongahela and Ohio rivers in one of America's most storied cities, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

by Rails to Trails Conservancy

During 2014, RTC conducted a study of the users of the trail. This study utilized a survey methodology previously tested on Pennsylvania trails and documented in RTC's Trail User Survey Workbook. This survey was designed to monitor trail user characteristics and economic impact.

An analysis of the data accumulated from infrared counters located along the trail and the completed surveys received from users indicates and estimated 622,873 annual user visits, resulting in a total economic impact in 2014 of $8,286,026.

About the Author


Rails to Trails Conservancy (RTC) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to creating a nationwide network of trails from former rail lines and connecting corridors to build healthier places for healthier people. RTC’s mission, and its value, is magnified in urban areas, where one mile of trail can completely redefine the livability of a community. Where trails are more than just recreational amenities, creating opportunities for active transportation and physical activity—improving our health and wellbeing—as they safely connect us to jobs, schools, businesses, parks, and cultural institutions in our own neighborhoods and beyond.

More articles by this author

More articles in this category

Benchmarking Bike Networks

posted Apr 17, 2024

This report summarizes guidance and best practices to create safer bicycle facilities and connect them into networks that allow more people to safely bike to more places within and throughout communities.

Setting Speed Limits for Health and Safety

posted Apr 17, 2024

This mini-report on setting speed limits shows the current framework for speed limit policies through a review of state laws that set speed limits.

Winter Recreation Planning

posted Nov 14, 2023

These case studies reveal a number of lessons learned that will be valuable in future winter travel management planning efforts.

TRAILS SAFE PASSING PLAN: STOP, SPEAK, and STAND BACK

posted Feb 14, 2023

Horses are prey animals and naturally can be afraid of unfamiliar people and objects. Horses have natural "flight“ survival instincts and prefer to move their feet towards an exit route. Therefore, people with horses should pass at a walk while other trail users remain STOPPED until passed.

385 views • posted 07/28/2020