Recommended Resources

Trail-Specific Recommended Resources

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published May 2018

"Share the Trail"

by Arizona State Parks and Trails

Understanding Shared-Use Trail Etiquette can make Hiking, Biking, and Riding Trails More Enjoyable for Everyone


published Apr 2015

Santa Paula Branch Line Recreational Trail Compatibility Survey

by Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC), Alta Planning + Design

This report is an inventory and analysis of existing trails in agricultural settings, with a focus on trails that are most comparable to the context of the Santa Paula Branch Line (SPBL) in Ventura County.


Oct 8, 2015

Youth Serving Accessibility – A Wonderful and Powerful Combination

This webinar will discuss how the Maryland Department of Natural Resources’ attention has focused in the past few years on creating more inclusive public access through youth programs and collaborations.


published Jun 1998

How Agencies Manage Multi-use Trails

Multi-Use Trail Management Policy: User-Group Conflict and Resource Impact Issues.


published Nov 1990

Trail Use Policies

A comprehensive document to guide use policies and regulations for a large suburban trail system south of the Bay Area.


published Aug 2016

Community Trail Development Guide

by Virginia Department of Transportation

VDOT developed this guide to aid the process of grassroots trail planning, based on the knowledge of experienced planners, research of best practices around the nation as well as the State, and the understanding gained from trail development process in the Town of Middleburg.


published Feb 2000

Omaha Recreational Trails: Their Effect on Property Values and Public Safety

Despite increased promotion of trails for health and recreation, critics of new trail development continue to raise questions about the suitability of trails in neighborhoods. Concerns often focus on the impact of trails on property values and public safety in different types of neighborhoods.


published Mar 2022

10-Year Trail Shared Stewardship Challenge

by USDA Forest Service

Why Do We Need a Trail Challenge? Despite the great work happening in support of trails, workload demands continue to outpace the capacity of agency staff, partners, and volunteers. To address these shortcomings, the Forest Service has issued a 10-year Trail Challenge. It focuses the collective energy and resources of the trail community on actions resulting in greater collective capacity to manage and maintain trails, as well as more miles of trails that are well-designed, well-maintained, and well-suited to support recreation use today and into the future.


published Feb 2017

Examining the Impacts of an Urban Greenway on Crime in Chicago

Using multiple analytical approaches, our study showed that creation of Chicago’s 606 was associated with decreases in violent, property, and disorderly crimes between 2011 and 2015


published May 2009

Sharing Our Trails: A Guide to Trail Safety and Enjoyment

National and state trail advocacy organizations representing equestrian, OHV, and bicycle interests collaborated in developing this new guide to trail use and safety.


published Jul 2009

Preventative Maintenance for Recreational Trails

by Minnesota Department of Transportation

The growth in recreational trails owned by the State, Cities, Counties, and Park systems over the last 20 plus years has exploded. Most if not all efforts related to recreational trails over these years has been focused on construction of new trails. There have been little organized efforts in trail preservation and or preventive maintenance (PM) methods to extend the usable life of the trails. The agencies that have a PM programs for their recreational trails rely on treatments that started out as highway or street treatments that may have been modified for use on the trails.


published Jul 2005

Rail-Trail Maintenance & Operation

by Tim Poole with Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (Northeast Regional Office)

In about two decades, rail-trails have risen from obscurity to become highly valued amenities for many American communities. Rail-trails preserve natural and cultural resources and provide both residents and tourists with attractive places to recreate and safe routes to their destinations.