USDA Forest Service Agreements Desk Guide

This Desk Guide has been developed as an easy reference tool to help you get started in the right direction as you contemplate on whether or not to partner with another party.

The Forest Service has a tradition of partnership as old as the Service itself. In the broad sense, partnership denotes sharing a common interest with the Forest Service in National Forest values and a relationship in pursuit of those common interests. Please keep in mind that this is just a guide. It is not meant to replace, supersede or compete with FSM 1580 or FSH 1509.11. The guide provides direction to reference sources. It also may alleviate research, but not eliminate it. Its biggest value may be in helping develop creative thinking about partnerships and what is possible within the authorities now in place. The information provided in this Desk Guide is current up to its 2003 date of publication, but keep in mind that like everything else things change, so always refer back to the appropriate FSM or FSH for any updates to agreement provisions and direction.


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Published January 01, 2003

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