Trail Intersection Design Guidelines

The growth in trails reflects many people’s enjoyment of physical separation from motorized traffic. Segregation allows trail users to avoid the pollution, noise, and intimidation they perceive from motor vehicles, and the potential for an injury producing crash.

by Florida Department of Transportation



Published September 01, 2007

About the Author


The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT or Department) is an executive agency, which means it reports directly to the Governor. FDOT’s primary statutory responsibility is to coordinate the planning and development of a safe, viable, and balanced state transportation system serving all regions of the state, and to assure the compatibility of all components, including multimodal facilities. A multimodal transportation system combines two or more modes of movement of people or goods. Florida’s transportation system includes roadway, air, rail, sea, spaceports, bus transit, and bicycle and pedestrian facilities.

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