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posted Aug 17, 2020

Oregon, California, Mormon Pioneer, and Pony Express National Historic Trails Long-Range Interpretive Plan

by National Park Service

This plan provides broad-based policies, guidelines, and standards for administering the four trails to ensure the protection of trail resources, their interpretation, and their continued use. Subsequent planning efforts tier off of the Comprehensive Management and Use Plan and provide more detailed recommendations and guidance. Among the many recommendations in the Comprehensive Management and Use Plan is one calling for a trails-wide interpretive plan.


posted Aug 17, 2020

Oregon, California, Mormon Pioneer, and Pony Express National Historic Trails Comprehensive Management and Use Plan / Final Environmental Impact Statement

by National Park Service

This Comprehensive Management and Use Plan / Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Oregon, California, Mormon Pioneer, and Pony Express National Historic Trails is shaped, in part, by the planning requirements found in section 5(f) of the National Trails System Act. It focuses on the trails’ purpose and significance, issues and concerns related to current conditions along the trails, resource protection, visitor experience and use, and long-term administrative and management objectives. Elements of the proposed plan have been developed in cooperation with federal, state, and local agencies, as well as nonprofit trails organizations — the entities that form the core of any partnership for national historic trails.


posted Aug 17, 2020

Interview with Greg Harris of the Missouri Rock Island Trail

by Josh Adams

American Trails contributing author Josh Adams spoke with Greg Harris about the very exciting Rock Island Trail project. In 2019 the Rock Island Trail got a huge boost when a 144-mile corridor was donated to expand the trail.


posted Aug 17, 2020

National Trails System Reference Manual 45

by National Park Service

This document is designed for National Trails System partners: Federal trail administrators, local land managers and landowners, volunteer partners, and State and Tribal agencies. It focuses on America’s national scenic and historic trails with only brief mention of national recreation trails and connecting-and-side trails. It provides background to Director’s Order #45, National Trails System (see Section 2.6).


posted Aug 17, 2020

National Scenic and Historic Trails Strategy and Work Plan

by Bureau of Land Management

The Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) National Landscape Conservation System Office is pleased to provide you with the National Scenic and Historic Trails (NSHT) Strategy and Work Plan. The purpose of this national-level strategy is to provide a 10-year framework for the development of program guidance and direction for improved management of the BLM’s NSHT Program.


posted Aug 17, 2020

Facts and Myths About Snowmobiling and Winter Trails

by American Council of Snowmobile Assns. (ACSA)

Did you know that the majority of the 135,0000 miles of snowmobile trails are open for multiple use? Read about the facts and myths of multiple use winter recreation!


posted Aug 17, 2020

National Scenic and Historic Trail Administration

by Bureau of Land Management

This manual provides the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) policy and program guidance on administering congressionally designated National Trails as assigned by the Department of the Interior within the National Landscape Conservation System (NLCS) and this manual describes the BLM’s roles, responsibilities, agency interrelationships, and policy requirements for National Trail Administrators


posted Aug 17, 2020

Ski Trail Grooming Guide

by NWT Recreation and Parks Assn.

NWT communities are connected by countless numbers of trails, though few of them are dedicated ski trails. With a little work, some equipment and know-how, ski doo trails, walking trails, cutlines, riverbeds, fields and lakes can be turned into quality ski trails. And it’s well worth the effort. Groomed and tracked ski trails are easier to ski on, easier to learn on, better to race on and a whole lot faster than bush trails. Groomed trails turn skiing into skiing!


posted Aug 14, 2020

Why Trails?

by American Trails

Whether hiking, bicycling, riding on horseback or participating in motorized recreation nearly everyone uses trails for a similar goal – to spend time outdoors. This time outside, whether a short walk down a paved trail to work in an urban setting, or a hike to a point reachable to only a few Americans makes trail users happier people.


posted Aug 14, 2020

The Economic Impact of Snowmobiling in Utah

by Institute of Outdoor Recreation and Tourism at Utah State University

An analysis on the value of snowmobiling to Utah’s economy, the sociodemographic composition of participants, and more.


posted Aug 14, 2020

Economic Impact and Importance of Snowmobiling in Idaho

by Department of Economics, Boise State University

Snowmobiling provides a major recreational opportunity in Idaho given the State’s climatic conditions and mountainous terrain. In addition to the enjoyment provided by snowmobiling, it generates significant impacts in terms of employment and economic activity in many counties and for the State as a whole. In order to estimate the economic importance of snowmobiling in Idaho, the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation (IDPR) contracted with the Department of Economics at Boise State University (BSU) to perform this study of snowmobiling on a county by- county basis and statewide.


posted Aug 14, 2020

Best Management Practices for Adaptive Trail Grooming

by American Council of Snowmobile Assns. (ACSA)

Trail grooming has changed significantly since initial trails and grooming programs were established decades ago. Snowmobile tourism has grown, bringing higher user expectations and requirements. At the same time trail grooming equipment and operating costs have also increased dramatically compared to costs in previous decades. Consequently grooming management in today’s operating atmosphere requires more adaptive approaches to be most responsive to increased needs, expectations, and costs.