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Ski Trail Grooming Guide

NWT communties are connected by countless numbers of trails, though few of them are dedicated ski trails. With a little work, some equipment and know-how, ski doo trails, walking trails, cutlines, riverbeds, fields and lakes can be turned into quality ski trails. And it’s well worth the effort. Groomed and tracked ski trails are easier to ski on, easier to learn on, better to race on and a whole lot faster than bush trails. Groomed trails turn skiing into skiing!

by NWT Recreation and Parks Assn.


NWT Grooming Guide


Within each section of this guide, you’ll find descriptions of these basic processes: the methods, the tools and some tips for each grooming procedure. This isn’t a recipe book, though, nor is it comprehensive. Ski trail grooming is part science, part art, part magic and a whole lot of experience. The more practice you get, the better you will understand how to groom in your neck of the woods. You’ll also probably encounter some unexpected challenges. Hopefully, the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ’s) at the end of this guide will prove helpful. If not, trail groomers are usually a helpful bunch. If you don’t know any ski trail groomers in your region, call the NWTRPA Trails Coordinator for a list of possible contacts.

Published September 2011

About the Author


Established in 1989, the NWT Recreation and Parks Association is works with communities across the NWT to promote healthy living through active recreation.

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