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published Feb 2014

Safe Routes to Everywhere

by Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC)

Transportation connects people and places. It provides access to jobs, education, shopping and recreation. More than one-quarter of all trips we make are less than a mile — an easy walking distance — and nearly one-half of all trips are within three miles — an easy biking distance. Yet, we make more than 78 percent of these short trips by car.


published Sep 2018

Planning Trails With Wildlife In Mind - CASE STUDIES and PROJECTS

by American Trails Staff

See examples of trail design in habitat areas, techniques for managing visitors, trail system planning, habitat restoration, trails as part of habitat conservation, and education on the value of wildlife and habitat.


Feb 23, 2017

Creative Reassembling of Former Railroad Corridors

Has the idea of a trail built upon a former railroad or former trolley corridor been proposed in your town but never got built because of a gap? Or perhaps the gap prevents a longer, more useful trail? This webinar serves as a good starting point for such a project.


published Jul 2006

Shared-Use Path Level of Service Calculator and Users Guide

by Federal Highway Administration

The purpose of this guide is to introduce practitioners and others to: 1) the findings of our study on the quality of service on trails; 2) a new analytical tool called the Shared-Use Path Level of Service (LOS) Calculator, and 3) potential implications for trail design.


published Sep 2006

Wake County, North Carolina, Trail Design Guidelines

​The Consolidated Open Space Plan (COSP) guides the work of Wake County's Open Space Program. The Plan presents policy recommendations, program guidelines and suggested methods that should be used by the County and its partners to conserve remaining open space.


published Jul 2011

Development of Trails along Canals, Flood Channels, and other Waterways

by Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC)

Shared-use pathways along the banks of irrigation canals, flood channels, and other waterways can serve important recreational and transportation functions. The easy grade, scenic interest, and minimal road crossings make shared-use paths along waterways highly attractive as trails for recreation, transportation, and a healthy, active lifestyle, particularly in urbanized areas.


published Jan 1999

Shared-Use Path Design

A shared-use path serves as part of a transportation circulation system and supports multiple recreation opportunities, such as walking, bicycling, and inline skating. A shared-use path typically has a surface that is asphalt, concrete, or firmly packed crushed aggregate.


published Oct 2009

FAQ: Building trails near ports

by American Trails Staff

Examples of combined recreational and industrial uses on east and west coast port properties.


published Jan 2011

Universal Accessibility of "Accessible" Fitness and Recreational Facilities for Persons With Mobility Disabilities

by Kelly P. Arbour-Nicitopoulos with McMaster University, Kathleen A. Martin Ginis with McMaster University

This study descriptively measured the universal accessibility of “accessible” fitness and recreational facilities for Ontarians living with mobility disabilities.


published Jan 2018

Albany-Hudson Electric Trail Concept Plan

The Albany-Hudson Electric Trail is an important part of the Empire State Trail, providing a key link between the Capital Region and the Mid-Hudson Valley. Since the trail is being developed along electrical utility lines, this plan incorporates design guidelines addressing safety and operational concerns.


published Aug 2016

Achieving Multimodal Networks

by Federal Highway Administration

This publication is intended to be a resource for practitioners seeking to build multimodal transportation networks.


published Mar 2013

Minimizing Risk and Liability

by Alberta Tourism, Parks and Recreation Parks Division

This document is a best practices manual intended to give guidance and direction on minimizing risk and liability for persons with an interest in operating and maintaining trails. Specifically, it seeks to help trail operators, managers and owners, mitigate risk and reduce liability, that can arise from trail design, trail use and maintenance operations. The techniques discussed here are intended to be applied with prudence and due consideration of the particular circumstances of each trail.