Incorporating On-Road Bicycle Networks into Resurfacing Projects

Installing bicycle facilities during roadway resurfacing projects is an efficient and cost-effective way for communities to create connected networks of bicycle facilities. This workbook provides recommendations for how roadway agencies can integrate bicycle facilities into their resurfacing program. The workbook also provides methods for fitting bicycle facilities onto existing roadways, cost considerations, and case studies.

by Federal Highway Administration


Resurfacing workbook


This resource for Incorporating On-Road Bicycle Networks into Resurfacing Projects provides recommendations for how roadway agencies can integrate bikeways into their resurfacing program. By installing bicycle facilities during resurfacing projects, agencies can create connected networks of bicycle facilities in an efficient and costeffective manner.

FHWA supports a flexible approach to roadway design that can allow the installation of bicycle facilities on many roadways when they are resurfaced. There should be continued education targeted at design practitioners to emphasize the flexibility that exists within current design guidance, and the strong support of FHWA for using this flexibility to create connected bicycle networks everywhere. These connected bicycle networks provide increased transportation options, enhance access to jobs, schools, and essential services, and increase the utility of our existing transportation network. Providing bicycle facilities when resurfacing roadways is one tool that cities, counties, and States can use to expand their bikeway networks.

Published March 2016

About the Author


The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), part of the US Department of Transportation, provides expertise, resources, and information to improve the nation's highway system and its intermodal connections. The Federal-Aid Highway Program provides financial assistance to the States to construct and improve the National Highway System, other roads, bridges, and trails.

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