Strategies for Accelerating Multimodal Project Delivery

This Workbook describes thirteen (13) key strategies that have been used effectively to accelerate multimodal projects and provides examples and case studies for each.

by Federal Highway Administration


Multimodal Project Del


This Workbook can be used by transportation agencies to assess their current project delivery practices, clarify misconceptions about specific USDOT requirements and policies relating to project delivery, and lay the groundwork for improving and accelerating the delivery of their multimodal projects. This Workbook has been organized to correspond to the different phases of a typical project development process. From planning and programming through design and construction, the strategies presented in this Workbook offer ideas and inspiration from agencies that have successfully implemented them. The Workbook is designed to be viewed electronically so that readers can quickly find and link to applicable strategies. The Workbook provides numerous relevant resources and realworld examples of projects that have applied the strategies featured in this document. References and hyperlinks are located in Section V.

This Workbook describes thirteen (13) key strategies that have been used effectively to accelerate multimodal projects. Each strategy is written as a standalone section. The following Workbook Navigation Guides point readers to the most useful strategies to overcome existing or potential challenges to delivering multimodal projects efficiently. The first guide lists the most relevant strategies within each phase of project development. The second guide lists the strategies that are most relevant to key challenges expressed by practitioners

Published October 01, 2018

About the Author


The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), part of the US Department of Transportation, provides expertise, resources, and information to improve the nation's highway system and its intermodal connections. The Federal-Aid Highway Program provides financial assistance to the States to construct and improve the National Highway System, other roads, bridges, and trails.

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