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published Nov 2005

Maintenance Checklist for Greenways and Urban Trails

by Jed Wagner with Denver Parks and Recreation Department

Denver has 130 miles of paved trails, open 24 hours a day and maintained for year-round use. Snow removal begins at 5 a.m. after winter storms.


published Apr 2002

Roadway and Bikeway Maintenance Practices

Specific issues and goals for maintaining bikeways and the roadway edge where the majority of bicycling takes place.


published Jul 2019

DCR Trails Guidelines and Best Practices Manual

by Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation

The DCR’s Trails Program seeks to provide a safe, quality recreation experience for a diverse range of trail users while practicing sound stewardship of the Commonwealth’s natural and cultural resources. This “Trails Guidelines and Best Practices Manual” meets this responsibility by providing a consistent set of trail management policies, guidelines, procedures, and best practices in sustainable trail development.


published Feb 2018

Operations, Maintenance, and Stewardship 101

by Robert (Bob) Searns with Robert Searns and Associates, Inc.

It's not as glamorous as building the trail. There is no ribbon cutting for a maintenance program and seldom does upkeep win a national award. Yet, operations, maintenance, and stewardship are essential to the safe use, enjoyment, and long-term success of any trail.


published Dec 2014

How Communities are Paying to Maintain Trails, Bike Lanes, and Sidewalks

by Advocacy Advance

This report addresses both the technical and political challenges of how communities are paying to maintain trails, bike lanes, and sidewalks. It examines agency maintenance policies and provides examples of communities who’ve successfully made these facilities a priority.


published Jan 2005

Guidelines for Snowmobile Trail Groomer Operator Training

by International Association of Snowmobile Administrators (IASA)

The purpose of this resource guide is to provide snowmobiling agencies, associations, and clubs with guidelines that are a resource for grooming, maintenance, and increasing community awareness of snowmobile trails.


published Jan 2011

Adopt-a-Trail Manual

by National Park Service

The Adopt-a-Trail manual addresses the work accomplished in the Adopt-a-Trail program. This manual is meant to acquaint the maintainer with park procedures, duties involved in adopting a trail, and methods for safely performing those duties.


published Jun 2010

Trail Operation and Maintenance Requirements

The County of Cumberland, NJ studied a series of railroad corridors for possible trail use including maintenance responsibilities. The Feasibility Study was written by Campbell Thomas & Co. of Philadelphia, PA.


published Jul 2017

Unpaved Non-Motorized Trail Guidelines

by Florida Office of Greenways and Trails

We all know a good trail when we’re on one. We’re not disoriented due to lack of signage or markers. We’re not climbing over downed trees or ducking under branches, and we’re not slogging through water or mud unless we’ve been forewarned beforehand. A good trail is one where we can fully enjoy our surroundings while challenging ourselves if that is our intent. Trails should provide for a variety of trail distances, loops, ecosystems, scenery and degrees of difficulty. As trail professionals, we should strive to make the best possible experience for users and learn from the past.


published Dec 1999

Tennessee Greenways and Trails Program Accessibility Guidelines

Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation guidelines on accessible trails


published Oct 1998

Off-Highway Vehicle Trail and Road Grading Equipment

by USDA Forest Service, Federal Highway Administration

The Missoula Technology and Development Center (MTDC) was asked to find a good way to maintain a 40-mile (64-k) motorcycle and all-terrain-vehicle (ATV) trail on the Francis Marion National Forest in coastal South Carolina. Heavy use leaves a washboard surface that progresses to mounds and gullies several feet across. These are called "whoop-de-doos," and trail users find them both unpleasant and unsafe.


published May 1999

Burke-Gilman Trail Vegetation Management Guidelines

Approaches to vegetation management and restoration, including native character, views, tree planting, invasive species, soil erosion control, and hazard tree management.