Recommended Resources

Trail-Specific Recommended Resources

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published Jul 2022

A Call for Expanding Trails Research

by Jeffrey Marion with U.S. Geological Survey

Trails research can help support trail management decision-making and funding by providing objective, quantitative information describing trail users, their numbers and demographics, preferences, and economic expenditures.


posted Feb 19, 2018

Traffic on the Trail

by Allison Jones with Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Jamie Rae Walker, Ph.D Texas A&M Extension

This presentation will focus on the key components of trail user count methodologies.


posted Feb 19, 2018

CYA – Cover Your Assets

Help limit liability.


posted Jun 5, 2019

Big City Trails: Planning for Forest Protection

by Mike Halferty with City of Toronto - Urban Foresty Branch

This poster session presentation summarizes the process of developing the City of Toronto's Natural Environment Trails Strategy and its outcomes.


published Jan 2010

Data Survey and Sampling Procedures to Quantify Recreation Use of National Forests in Alaska

by USDA Forest Service

Estimating visitor numbers and collecting information on visitor attitudes in Alaska national forests is especially challenging because of the dispersed access to the forests by a relatively small number of visitors.


posted Jun 5, 2019

Old Trails, New Systems: Re-Imagining Existing Trail Networks

by Peter Dolan with New York - New Jersey Trail Conference, Joshua Osowski with New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

Are you ready to view old trail networks with fresh eyes?


published May 2020

Improving the Sustainability of the Appalachian Trail

by U.S. Geological Survey

The Appalachian National Scenic Trail (A.T.) is a unique internationally recognized protected natural area encompassing more than 250,000 acres and a 2,190-mile footpath from Maine to Georgia.


published Dec 2008

The influence of use-related, environmental, and managerial factors on soil loss from recreational trails

by Jeffrey Marion with U.S. Geological Survey

This research investigated the influence of several use-related, environmental, and managerial factors on soil loss on recreational trails and roads at Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area, a unit of the U.S. National Park Service.


published May 2011

Informal and Formal Trail Monitoring Protocols and Baseline Conditions

by U.S. Geological Survey

This research developed and applied state-of-the-art trail condition assessment and monitoring procedures and applied them to the park’s formal and informal (visitor-created) trails.


published Jan 2004

Environmentally Sustainable Trail Management

by Jeffrey Marion with U.S. Geological Survey

This guide considers the environmental impacts of particular activities, viz., hiking and camping, off road vehicles and recreational boats, as well as impacts specific to certain ecosystems.


published Dec 2019

The Influence of Layout on Appalachian Trail Soil Loss, Widening, and Muddiness

by Jeffrey Marion with U.S. Geological Survey, Jeremy Wimpey, Ph.D. with Applied Trails Research

This research investigates the influence of layout and design on the severity of trail degradation.


published Jan 2022

Appalachian Mountain Club 2022 Outdoor Leader Handbook

by Appalachian Mountain Club

Outdoor leadership skills can be developed and improved over time through a combination of self-study, formal training and experience. Leadership trainings are offered frequently by volunteers and staff of the AMC. The trainings range from a single day to a weekend. If you are looking for additional training, the AMC offers several courses each season through the Guided Outdoors program.