Water Trails

How They Work and Why They Are an Important Part of the Trails Community

Successful water trails are the product of partnerships among a wide variety of public and private constituents.


Speakers: Jeff Duncan, Outdoor Recreation Planning, National Park Service Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance; Mary Crockett, Program Coordinator & River Manager for South Carolina Department of Natural Resources

Successful water trails are the product of partnerships among a wide variety of public and private constituents. This session explores several ways in which water trails are uniquely positioned to: build community support that generates valuable outcomes for the trail and community; tap into partnerships that provide practical solutions to water trail design, access, camping, and restrooms; and choose a name that serves not only to describe the trail but also to engage the public.

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