Study of Two Successful Canadian Rural Trails

by Linda Strong-Watson

A brief study of two successful rural trails, one utilizing an active irrigation canal alignment (Calgary to Chestermere Lake) and the other converted from an abandoned rail line (The Iron Horse Trail-Elk Point to Heinsburg).

Bridge on the Iron Horse Trail spanning the Beaver River, Alberta; photo by Becks


2Trails


Published January 01, 2000

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