New York to build the Empire State Trail, the largest state multi-use trail in the nation

The 750-mile trail will provide new opportunities for hiking and biking along scenic vistas and through charming, historic communities, driving tourism and economic activity across New York.

The FY 2018 State Budget provides $200 million to complete the Hudson River Valley Greenway and Erie Canalway trails and creates the Empire State Trail, the largest state multi-use trail in the nation. The 750-mile trail will provide new opportunities for hiking and biking along scenic vistas and through charming, historic communities, driving tourism and economic activity across New York. The Empire State Trail will span the state, from the New York Harbor up through the Adirondack Mountains to the Canadian border – and from the shores of Lake Erie along the historic Erie Canal to the heart of the Capital Region."

More Articles in this Category

Shannon Region Trails Programme in Ireland

The Shannon Region Trails Programme is a Shannon Development-led initiative which aims to establish the Shannon Region as a world-class destination for walking, cycling, water-based and other outdoor activity pursuits during the period 2007-2010.

Connecting 10 million People to the Outdoors in Los Angeles County

The story behind the development of LA Counties world-class trails mobile app and website covering 600+ parks, over 550 linear miles of trails, hundreds of points of interest.

FAQ: Examples of trail development ordinances

A few resources on public access to private land. Always check with your local planning department for zoning requirements.

Wildlife And Trails Primer - B. Avoiding large natural areas

Protecting large, undisturbed areas of wildlife habitat should be a priority. Deciding whether or not to build a trail that may contribute to fragmentation is a tradeoff that the local community or land manager will have to make.

The Shoreline Greenway Trail: a study in patience, flexibility, and creativity

The 25-mile trail along a stretch of Connecticut’s southern coast faces challenges from acquiring easements, to coordinating between four towns, to designing through varying types of terrain.