All Successful Trails Need Partnerships and Coalitions

This interactive presentation will discuss the importance of creating a strong coalition of diverse stakeholders and identify strategies to effectively engage them.

Speakers: Matt Rice, American Rivers, Associate Director of Southeast Conservation; Mary Crockett, Program Coordinator –River Manager for South Carolina Department of Natural Resources

Successful trails are the product of partnerships among a wide array of entities, including governmental land managing agencies, private property owners, user groups, local businesses, planners, chambers of commerce, and others. This interactive presentation will discuss the importance of creating a strong coalition of diverse stakeholders and identify strategies to effectively engage them when developing a water trail and share revelations (secrets?!) of how several partnerships between the U.S. Forest Service and non-profit organizations were created….even without any Agency budget! The takeaway for participants are succinct lessons learned that will dramatically increase their success in starting up and maintaining partnerships with other organizations.

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