filed under: health and social benefits


Use and Nonuse of a Rail Trail Conversion for Physical Activity: Implications for Promoting Trail Use

The purpose was to examine 9 adult activity settings in 25 community parks to determine the most and least frequently used by gender, physical-activity (PA) intensity, and ethnicity.

Cape Cod Rail Trail in Harwich, Massachusetts, 2014.


Implications for Promoting Trail Use


Anna E. Price and Julian A.

BACKGROUND

There is limited research examining both use and non-use of trails for physical activity.

Purpose

Such research might enable health educators to better promote physical activity on trails.

Methods

We used random digit dialing methods to survey 726 respondents in 2012.

Results

The majority (75.1%) of respondents reported not using the trail in the previous 6 months. The odds of using the trail were greater among adults compared to older adults and those with a high school degree or college degree compared to those with less than a high school degree. Fifteen percent of trail users reported using the trail regularly (i.e., at least 30 minutes, 3 days/week). Trail characteristics preferred by trail users and reasons for not using the trail among nonusers were also examined.

Discussion

These findings might be useful for health educators promoting physical activity on trails.

Practice

Persons promoting physical activity on trails should highlight those trail characteristics preferred by trail users, including the trails’ convenient location, beauty, and design. There is an opportunity to promote trail use among older adults and those with low education levels; promoting active transportation on trails might be especially useful among those with low education levels.

Published April 05, 2014

More Articles in this Category

Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans

This second edition of the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans provides science-based guidance to help people ages 3 years and older improve their health through participation in regular physical activity.

Mountain Biking as a Means to Encourage Public Health and Wellbeing

This manuscript explains how mountain biking is related to public health and the issues underlying trail access in the United States.

The Physiology of Mountain Biking

In recent years, competitive mountain biking has attracted the interest of sport scientists, and a small but growing number of physiological studies have been published. The aim of this review is to provide a synthesis of this literature and directions for future research.

Economic & Health Benefits of Bicycling in Iowa

This study identifies the economic and health impacts of bicycling in Iowa.