Rail-Trail Maintenance & Operation

Ensuring the Future of Your Trail - A Survey of 100 Rail-Trails

In about two decades, rail-trails have risen from obscurity to become highly valued amenities for many American communities. Rail-trails preserve natural and cultural resources and provide both residents and tourists with attractive places to recreate and safe routes to their destinations.

by Tim Poole, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (Northeast Regional Office)


Railtrailmaint


Published July 2005

About the Author


As the national voice of the rail-trail movement, we advocate for policies and federal legislation and support trail development efforts that benefit communities all across America. The Northeast Regional Officer serves the states of Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont

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Estimating visitor numbers and collecting information on visitor attitudes in Alaska national forests is especially challenging because of the dispersed access to the forests by a relatively small number of visitors.

Digging Into the Numbers Behind the Pandemic Trail Boom

As the summer unfolds, park and trail managers across North America are preparing for yet another recording breaking season. While it is too early to make definitive calls about the state of pandemic trail boom and future volumes on trails and in parks, early analyses suggest the boom is alive and well. During this unprecedented time, automated count data serves as a crucial tool to track changes, understand use, and make the work of trail managers just a little bit easier.

FAQ: Apps for Trail Management and Volunteers

Information on apps that can be used for trail management that would be suitable for volunteer-type organizations.