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posted Aug 17, 2020

Oregon, California, Mormon Pioneer, and Pony Express National Historic Trails Comprehensive Management and Use Plan / Final Environmental Impact Statement

by National Park Service

This Comprehensive Management and Use Plan / Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Oregon, California, Mormon Pioneer, and Pony Express National Historic Trails is shaped, in part, by the planning requirements found in section 5(f) of the National Trails System Act. It focuses on the trails’ purpose and significance, issues and concerns related to current conditions along the trails, resource protection, visitor experience and use, and long-term administrative and management objectives. Elements of the proposed plan have been developed in cooperation with federal, state, and local agencies, as well as nonprofit trails organizations — the entities that form the core of any partnership for national historic trails.


posted Aug 17, 2020

Oregon, California, Mormon Pioneer, and Pony Express National Historic Trails Long-Range Interpretive Plan

by National Park Service

This plan provides broad-based policies, guidelines, and standards for administering the four trails to ensure the protection of trail resources, their interpretation, and their continued use. Subsequent planning efforts tier off of the Comprehensive Management and Use Plan and provide more detailed recommendations and guidance. Among the many recommendations in the Comprehensive Management and Use Plan is one calling for a trails-wide interpretive plan.


posted Dec 5, 2019

Organizational Development Skills and Competencies

by American Trails Staff

Specific skills used in development of organizations for trails and greenways work: creating and building a nonprofit organization; managing boards and staff; recruiting, training, and rewarding volunteers; managing finances and legal issues.


posted Feb 28, 2020

Organizational Governance

In keeping with our values, American Trails aims to conduct all business with transparency and accountability to our donors and partners. Below you will find our governing documents and recent financial reports.


posted Jul 15, 2022

ORV – Social & Management Issues

Off-road vehicles can have a substantial impact on the experience of other non-motorized visitors on trails that are shared or even on adjacent forest or park settings.


posted Mar 26, 2024

Outdoor Enthusiasts Enjoy the Vermont Shorelines Thanks to the GEOWEB® Soil Confinement System

by Presto Geosystems

Outdoor enthusiasts enjoy scenic views along the Vermont shorelines thanks to the GEOWEB® Soil Confinement System.


posted Oct 11, 2023

Outdoor Industry Workforce Assessment Survey

by Oregon State University

There has been a collective desire across the outdoor recreation economy to gain a better understanding of two critically important and interconnected pieces of the industry: talent attraction and retention initiatives and diversity, equity, and inclusion outcomes.


posted Aug 17, 2020

Outdoor Participation Report 2018

by Outdoor Foundation

A participant in outdoor recreation is defined as an individual who took part in one or more of 42 outdoor activities at least once during 2017.


posted Oct 9, 2023

Outdoor Rec Drives Jobs

by Outdoor Recreation Roundtable, Oregon State University

The Outdoor Recreation Roundtable partnered with Oregon State University’s Center for the Outdoor Recreation Economy to look deeper into the career paths, workforce needs, and future opportunities across America’s outdoor recreation economy.


posted May 3, 2022

Outdoor Recreation and Conservation Careers Toolkit

by Transforming Youth Outdoors (TYO), U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Choose your outdoor career path! Get started by asking yourself some very basic questions. Even though you might not be able to answer all of them, it is a good first step to narrow down what you really want to do. Ready? Let’s go!


posted Jan 10, 2019

Outdoor Recreation in Oregon: Responding to Demographic and Societal Change

by Oregon State Parks

The plan addresses five important demographic and societal changes facing outdoor recreation providers in the coming years.


posted Mar 6, 2019

Outdoor Recreation Satellite Account: Updated Statistics for 2012-2016

Updated statistics from the Outdoor Recreation Satellite Account (ORSA) released by the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) show that the outdoor recreation economy accounted for 2.2 percent ($412 billion) of current-dollar GDP in 2016 (table 2). In data produced for the first time, using inflation-adjusted (real) GDP, the outdoor recreation economy grew 1.7 percent in 2016, faster than the 1.6 percent growth for the overall U.S. economy (table 6). In addition, real gross output, compensation, and employment all grew faster in outdoor recreation than in the overall economy in 2016.