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published Jan 2015

Economic Importance of Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation: An Analysis of Idaho Counties

During the period August 2012 through November 2012, the University of Idaho, in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation (IDPR), surveyed Idaho’s registered off-highway-vehicle (OHV) owners. The goal of the survey was to determine the economic importance of OHV use in Idaho during the previous 12 months. The survey sample was drawn from IDPR-registered OHV owners. OHV activities not related to recreation (e.g., work) and out-of-state visitors could not be sampled. Trips and expenditures for OHV recreation in Idaho would be higher if nonresident OHV recreation could be estimated.


published Oct 2004

Economic Value of Walkability

This paper describes ways to evaluate the value of walking (the activity) and walkability (the quality of walking conditions, including safety, comfort and convenience).


published Jan 2019

Economic, Environmental and Social Benefits of Recreational Trails in Washington State

by Washington Recreation and Conservation Office

This report evaluates the economic, environmental, and social benefits of outdoor recreation activities associated with trails and their nexus with the economy of Washington.


published Jun 2014

Economics of Idaho Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation

Off-highway vehicle (OHV) recreation in Idaho is big business. Idaho OHV enthusiasts took close to 1 million recreation trips in Idaho during 2012 and spent about $434 million – $186 million on OHV recreation trips and $248 million on OHV capital expenditures such as the vehicles themselves.


published Jan 2020

Economy, Environment and Health Benefit from Trails, Two New Studies Show

by American Trails Staff

Trails contribute more than $8.2 billion to Washington state's economy, according to companion studies released by the Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office.


Apr 22, 2021

Effective Programs to Improve Access and Use of Trails for Youth from Under-Resourced Communities

This webinar will identify trail studies and existing programs that may effectively promote and increase the use of trails among youth, especially those from under-resourced neighborhoods or communities.


published Jun 2013

Effects of Pack Weight on Endurance of Long-distance Hikers

This study evaluated pack weight to understand the limits of long-term load carriage. Participants were Appalachian Trail hikers who attempted to complete the entire trail in the 2012 season.


Jul 26, 2018

Engage Your Elected Officials! The Importance of Political Leadership

Moderated by Brian Housh with Rails-to-Trails Conservancy and presented by a panel of elected officials, this webinar will discuss successful tactics & strategies employed to establish funding mechanisms and innovative policy initiatives that support the development of trail networks demanded by constituents.


published Oct 2019

Engaging the Health Community

by Taylor Goodrich with American Trails

Trails are shown to improve health both mentally and physically, yet the healthcare industry and the trails industry rarely work together. There are many reasons for this, such as logistics, bureaucracy, and communication issues. We asked some leading experts how we can begin bridging these gaps.


published May 1987

Evaluation of the Burke-Gilman Trail's Effect on Property Values and Crime

This study looks at property values and crime rates adjacent to the rail-trail.


published Sep 2010

Every Mile Counts: Economic Analysis of 2008 New York Trail User Surveys

Surveys were undertaken on eight shared-use trails to see who uses these trails, how far they travel to a trail, and what they spend and on what items.


published Aug 2015

Exercise Intensity and Performance Aspects of Snow Biking through the Use of a Fat Bike

In recent years, fat bikes have become a popular option for mountain bikers. A fat bike is a mountain bike equipped with tires ranging from 9.3 – 10.1 cm wide, twice as wide as a traditional mountain bike tire (Barber, 2014). This allows them to be ridden at an inflation pressure as low as 27579 Pascal (4 PSI). The wide surface area, and low inflation pressure, of these tires allows for excellent handling of the bicycle while riding over sand, mud, and snow. It is difficult, if not impossible, for a traditional mountain bike to ride over such surfaces.