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published Jun 2018

Investigating the Thru-hiker Experience: A Study on the Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail

The phenomena of thru-hiking has been on a dramatic rise, spurring hikers to venture onto increasingly remote and challenging trails over extended periods of time. Despite the recent popularity of thru-hiking, the field remains relatively unstudied. In recreation, the expectations held beforehand have been linked to perceptions after an activity, but this has not been explored in thru-hiking.


published Jun 2018

Outdoor Participation Report 2018

by Outdoor Foundation

A participant in outdoor recreation is defined as an individual who took part in one or more of 42 outdoor activities at least once during 2017.


published Jun 2018

The Economic Impact of Snowmobiling in Utah

by Institute of Outdoor Recreation and Tourism at Utah State University

An analysis on the value of snowmobiling to Utah’s economy, the sociodemographic composition of participants, and more.


published Jun 2018

2018 Annual CRT Achievement Awards

The Coalition for Recreational Trails is pleased to announce the winners for the 2018 Tom Petri Annual Achievement Awards in recognition of outstanding use of Recreational Trails Program (RTP) funds.


published Jun 2018

2017 Recreational Trails Program Annual Report

by Federal Highway Administration

A report on the use and benefits of Federal Recreational Trails Program funds across the United States.


published May 2018

Economic Impact of Parks

by National Recreation and Park Association

An Examination of the Economic Impacts of Operations and Capital Spending by Local Park and Recreation Agencies on the U.S. Economy


published May 2018

Promoting Parks and Recreation’s Role in Economic Development

by National Recreation and Park Association

This study builds on previous NRPA research on the economic importance of local park and recreation agencies by exploring the role that quality park amenities play in 21st century regional economic development.


published Apr 2018

Connecting Parkersburg to Pittsburgh by Rail-Trail: Bringing a world-class trail network to West Virginia

by Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC)

This study focuses on the segment of the P2P corridor that lies within the state of West Virginia, from Parkersburg to the West Virginia–Pennsylvania border, just north of Morgantown. The primary alignment of the P2P corridor utilizes existing rail-trails and unused or abandoned rail corridors, and was largely determined through the collaborative efforts of P2P corridor partners. The size and scope of this project produce inherent complexities that will take many partners—working in coordination over several years—to complete.


published Mar 2018

Case Studies in Realizing Co-Benefits of Multimodal Roadway Design and Gray and Green Infrastructure

by Federal Highway Administration

This document highlights case studies of projects that contribute to safe and connected pedestrian and bicycle networks in States and communities throughout the U.S., while at the same time providing resiliency and green infrastructure benefits that promote resiliency and relieve burdens on stormwater systems.


published Mar 2018

Businesses Along the Longleaf Trace

Visitors and supporters often ask how the Longleaf Trace has affected the economies of the towns along the Trace.


published Feb 2018

Sheepskin Trail Feasibility Study

by Gibson-Thomas Engineering

The Sheepskin Trail, a rail-trail project is a proposed 34 mile bicycle/pedestrian path that will extend from Dunbar Township to Point Marion Borough at the Pennsylvania/West Virginia state line. The intent of this study update is to utilize and update the 1999 Feasibility Study as necessary based on changes to the trail corridor that have occurred in the past 18 years.


published Jan 2018

MO-MOTO OHV Incorporated – OHV Tourism Economic Impact Overview

OHV recreation is a proven financial stimulus to the tourism market with the average rider spending a minimum of $100 on a single day trip. We should encourage struggling areas to embrace OHV tourism as we have the opportunity to directly impact and benefit financial success of local businesses. We can connect rural Missouri to OHV trails, which would provide new employment and income while bringing new money to these distressed regions. OHV tourism can diversify the economy of South East Missouri and create a culture of entrepreneurship based around trail oriented business (outfitters, rentals, guides, cabins, hotels, restaurants, etc) the same way the state park industry has to several Missouri communities.