Lessons Learned from Creative Problem-Solving

A TRAILSNext™ presentation

In this presentation find out what worked and what didn't with San Jose, California's urban trail network.

by Yves Zsutty, Division Manager, City of San Jose - Parks, Recreation, and Neighborhood Services

Every trail project is different and provides opportunities for success and failures. San Jose has developed a 60-mile Trail Network with 40 more miles planned for development. This presentation showcases 25 completed San Jose Trail projects with focused and honest discussion about what worked, what didn't work, and the lessons learned.

The projects selected offer a broad range of findings gained from all phases of development, from initial scoping through studies, planning, design and construction. Tips will be offered on how to manage and message challenges in a straightforward and engaging manner to sustain community support.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand that setting goals is worthwhile when tactically and intentionally aligned to projects.
  • Manage in a creative manner to address project challenges for positive outcomes.
  • Structure flow for large scale projects in a clear and phases manner to sustain multi-year stakeholder support.

About the Author

Yves Zsutty is a Division Manager for the City of San Jose - Department of Parks, Recreation, and Neighborhood Services, overseeing the Capital Improvement Program division. He oversees delivery of Parks, Trails and Projects. Formerly, the department’s Trail Manager, Yves has guided planning of a 100-mile inter-connected trail network that serves recreational and commuting objectives. He has overseen development of over 35 miles of Class I trails and secured over $40,000,000 in grant funding from Local, State and Federal sources. San Jose’s existing 62-mile urban trail network is already one of the nation’s largest, and recognized by the FHWA for Transportation Planning Excellence. Yves has a degree in Civil Engineering from San Jose State University, and enjoys gardening, photography and travel…and some hiking.

Contact: [email protected]

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