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Veterans Service & Conservation Corps

Career Pathways Through Continued Service

AmeriCorps investments in Veterans Corps, and veterans national service opportunities generate positive returns for our communities, our veterans, and our nation as a whole. By supporting in-demand skills development and the completion of priority projects, AmeriCorps is critical to Veterans Corps.

by The Corps Network


Veteran Service and Conservation Corps 2019


The transition from service member to civilian is not always an easy path for our nation’s veterans. Many experience a lack of purpose, a lack of job confidence, and feel they no longer have the level of peer support they had while serving. Veterans Conservation Corps are particularly adept at addressing these challenges by allowing veterans to build on their military experience and ethic of service by training for careers in resource management.

Today’s Veterans Corps connect veterans to the places they fought to protect, and provide an environment that promotes healing and a continued sense of community. In 2016, 90 percent of Veterans Corps alumni surveyed indicated that Corps opportunities helped them transition from military to civilian life.

The Corps model benefits veterans in a range of ways: it provides a similar structure and sense of purpose as the military; offers the therapeutic benefits of getting outdoors and working with fellow veterans; and helps participants transition back to civilian life through skills development and other supportive services.

Published September 2017

About the Author


Corps are locally-based organizations that engage young adults and post-9/11 veterans in service addressing recreation, conservation, disaster response, and community needs. Through a defined term of service, Corps participants – or “Corpsmembers” – gain work experience and develop in-demand skills.

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