filed under: federal legislation


Equestrian and Other Nonmotorized Use on Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities

Link to Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Guidance

Equestrian and other nonmotorized recreational use may be allowed on shared use paths and trails that use Federal-aid transportation funds.

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) receives occasional inquiries about equestrian and other nonmotorized use of facilities funded with Federal-aid highway program funds under Section 217 of title 23, United States Code, especially for projects using Transportation Enhancement funds.

Equestrian and other nonmotorized recreational use may be allowed on shared use paths and trails that use Federal-aid transportation funds. Federal transportation laws and regulations do not prohibit equestrians, in-line skaters, skateboarders, cross country skiers, snowshoe users, or other nonmotorized users on shared use paths or trails. States or local managers may choose to prohibit these uses; but it is a State or local determination, and not a Federal requirement. Various design options may allow equestrian use, such as providing both a paved path and an unpaved path within the same right-of-way.

Read More

Published February 2011

More Articles in this Category

Recreational Trails Program Highlight: Tennessee State Parks Tires to Trails Program

Tennessee State Parks Win National Award for Tires to Trails Program

Recreational Trails Program Highlight: Brighton Park, Ohio

Brighton Park, formerly the Henninger Landfill, was a construction and demolition debris landfill in the Old Brooklyn neighborhood of Cleveland that ceased operation in the 1980s.

Recreational Trails Program Highlight: Prison Hill 5th Street Trailhead Project, Nevada

Visible throughout Carson City, the approximately 2,500 acre Prison Hill Recreation Area has been set aside and dedicated as open space for the community of Carson City.

A Call for Expanding Trails Research

Trails research can help support trail management decision-making and funding by providing objective, quantitative information describing trail users, their numbers and demographics, preferences, and economic expenditures.