Developing and Operating Water Trails at the Local, Statewide and Regional Levels

Come learn how water trails are connecting people to waterways as practitioners describe their successful programs of developing and managing extensive water trails.


Speakers: Peter Hark, Operations Manager, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources; James McNulty, Susquehanna River Water Trail Association; Angie Tornes, Natural & Recreation Resource Planner, National Park Service Rivers and Trails Program

Come learn how water trails are connecting people to waterways as practitioners describe their successful programs of developing and managing extensive water trails. This session will focus on three distinct programs, the Susquehanna River and brief mention of the Pennsylvania Water Trail Program, the Lake Superior Water Trail - an international and multi-state effort, and Minnesota's management of over 4,000 miles of Water Trails. Funding and completing water trails requires a strong vision, development of citizen and agency support, partnerships, unending persistence, and creativity. Learn how these components have resulted in water trails that have had positive ecological, economic and cultural benefits for the community, state, and region.

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