filed under: featured trails


Cress Creek Nature Trail, Idaho

Cress Creek Nature Trail is a self-guided interpretative trail that highlights the unique natural characteristics of eastern Idaho.

Cress Creek; photo by Sarah Wheeler

Featured
National Recreation Trail

Designated in 2005


• View more details for this trail
in the NRT Database

• Learn about the NRT Program.

You will become familiar with life in the Cress Creek area as it is now and as it was long ago. If you hike quietly you may see deer, rabbits, small lizards, maybe even an eagle or a moose. While traveling through dryer desert environments along the trail, the expansive cottonwood forests are easily viewed below along the South Fork of the Snake River.

The trail serves a wide variety of users, with wheelchair accessibility for the first half-mile and steeper slopes closer to the top of the mountain loop. Tables and benches are located throughout the trail in order for visitors to sit and enjoy the scenery, read the interpretative signs, or break for a snack.

The nature trail is self- guided with many beautiful interpretive signs posted along the way to assist you. The 18 interpretative signs discuss topics ranging from the geologic features that can be seen from the trail such as volcanoes, to the vegetation found in the surrounding wet and dry environments. The first half mile of the trail is accessible by wheelchair. The upper trail follows the creek and goes over a small bridge. It meanders its way through juniper and bunchgrass where it narrows and gets steeper as you climb toward the top. If you are really adventurous, you can go the top of the mountain where you catch a breath-taking view of our world in eastern Idaho.

Discover this beautiful nature trail just a short distance from Idaho Falls on the scenic South Fork of the Snake River. Cress Creek derives its name from the watercress plant, a favorite food of the moose that live in this area. With clear skies, prepare for quite an expansive view of the Snake River, volcanoes and farmland. Plenty of parking, restrooms and trail accessibility opens Cress Creek to a wider spectrum of trail users.

For more information

Bureau of Land Management:

Eastern Idaho Visitor Center, 630 West Broadway, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83402 (208) 523-1012

Upper Snake Field Office, 1405 Hollipark Drive, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83401 (208) 524-7500

Future rangers listening to Smoke; photo by Sarah Wheeler

Future rangers listening to Smoke; photo by Sarah Wheeler

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