Colorado State Parks Motorized Vehicle Trail Use Guidelines

From the Colorado Off-Highway Vehicle Program

Safety considerations and trail use guidelines for OHV recreation

by Colorado State Parks, State OHV Program Manager

Safety considerations

  • Plan ahead. The weather can change rapidly.
  • Carry all necessary supplies including an emergency repair kit, food, water and warm clothing.
  • Develop a supply checklist to include the above items and other equipment such as area maps and guides, protective gear, flashlight, sunscreen, etc.
  • Know what to wear. Quality helmets, gloves, boots, goggles and protective clothing will keep you comfortable and help prevent serious injuries.
  • Know your vehicle. Keep it in good condition and read the owner's manual.
  • Let someone know where you're going and when you expect to return.
  • Travel with other people.
  • Know before leaving what to do in an emergency.

Trail use guidelines

  • Respect all private and public property and the rights of all recreationists to enjoy nature.
  • Park considerately without blocking other vehicles or impeding access to trails.
  • Keep to the right when meeting other recreationists and yield the right-of-way to downhill traffic.
  • Slow down and use caution when approaching or overtaking another.
  • Travel only where motorized vehicles are permitted.
  • Respect designated areas, trail use signs and established ski tracks. Stay out of wilderness areas.
  • Do not block the trail when stopping.
  • Do not disturb wildlife. Avoid all areas posted for their protection or feeding.
  • Do not litter. Pack out everything you pack in.
  • Realize that your destination and travel speed are determined by your equipment, ability, terrain, weather and traffic on the trail. Plan accordingly.
  • Do not interfere with or harass others. Recognize that people form opinions about all motorized vehicle users based on your actions.

About the Author


CPW is charged with balancing the conservation of our wildlife and habitat with the recreational needs of our state. The Future Generations Act passed in 2018 provides specific goals designed to help us achieve that balance. Our agency mission is critical and relevant to all Coloradans, and we need the support of all Coloradans in fulfilling this critical work.

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