Albany-Hudson Electric Trail Trail Maintenance Plan

The AHET is a 36-mile bicycling and pedestrian “rail-trail“ from the City of Rensselaer to the City of Hudson in Rensselaer and Columbia Counties on an actively used National Grid owned right of way. Trail

by Hudson River Valley Greenway


AHET Trail Maintenance Plan Final 12 30 19


This plan provides a detailed list of required trail maintenance activities, including the frequency of each task. Routine maintenance needs for the Trail are modest. The largest item is mowing a narrow 3 to 4-foot strip of grass along both sides of the trail and designated parking areas during the growing season. Similarly, weed whacking (with hand-held string 4 trimmers) will be required several times each year around benches, fences, signposts, and other amenities. Other needs include removing the occasional branch or tree that falls onto the trail and addressing any dumping of trash or litter (to the extent it occurs).

The plan provides two frequencies – “Required” versus “Enhanced” – for maintenance activities. For example, the grass margins and lawn areas along the trail should be mowed at least four times per year. However, an enhanced schedule of mowing every two weeks during the growing season is ideal (total of 10 times per year), if staffing resources are available.

Published December 2019

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A unique state agency created to preserve the scenic, natural, historic, cultural and recreational resources of the Hudson Valley.

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