A Path to Remember

Designing Trails with Art and History

This session will highlight design development of the Urban Arts Leg of the City of Jackson’s (MI) Riverwalk Trail on the Grand River, complemented by a survey of several recent National Park Service trail projects that integrate public art.

Speakers: Charles Tracy, National Park Service Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance; Lori Singleton, ASLA, Associate, Lead Designer, Hamilton Anderson Associates

Sensitive trail design can promote an awareness of industrial, cultural, environmental, and historic heritage. Many trails interface with sites that provide opportunities to tell important stories, to reveal the landscape's history, and to convey a stronger sense of regional cultural identity. The real challenge is finding creative ways that truly inspire and connect with trail users in an information-saturated era. This session will highlight design development of the Urban Arts Leg of the City of Jackson’s (MI) Riverwalk Trail on the Grand River, complemented by a survey of several recent National Park Service trail projects that integrate public art.

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