WSDOT Shared-Use Path Design Manual

A Washington State DOT guide to designing shared-use paths.

by Washington Department of Transportation (WSDOT)



Chehalis Western Trail south of Olympia, WA

Chapter 1515 - Shared Use Paths - Design Manual M 22-01

Shared-use paths are designed for both transportation and recreation purposes and are used by pedestrians, bicyclists, skaters, equestrians, and other users. Some common locations for shared-use paths are along rivers, streams, ocean beachfronts, canals, utility rights of way, and abandoned railroad rights of way; within college campuses; and within and between parks as well as within existing roadway corridors. A common application is to use shared-use paths to close gaps in bicycle networks. There might also be situations where such facilities can be provided as part of planned developments. Where a shared-use path is designed to parallel a roadway, provide a separation between the path and the vehicular traveled way in accordance with this chapter.

Published September 01, 2019

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