filed under: health and social benefits


Urban Nature for Human Health and Well-Being

A research summary for communicating the health benefits of urban trees and green space

This report summarizes some of the most prominent research related to nature and public health to help urban natural resource professionals, urban planners, architects, educators, health professionals, and community groups effectively communicate the health benefits of urban nature to their constituents.

by USDA Forest Service


Urban Nature for Human Health and Well-being


People are dependent on nature for food, water, security, health, and well-being—we are connected with the natural world for our very survival. Green spaces also make us happier and healthier. The evidence of the link between nature, health, and preventive medicine will hopefully spur more direct collaboration between the health, urban planning, education, and natural resource communities. With the growing pressures of modern life, these are critical connections to pursue; the answers to some of the biggest challenges facing these groups lie in the recognition of shared interests, goals, and objectives. This area of research will continue to grow in the com­ing years and decades, illuminating the essential role that nature plays in the health and well-being of our minds, bodies, and spirit.

Published January 2018

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