Universal Accessibility of "Accessible" Fitness and Recreational Facilities for Persons With Mobility Disabilities

This study descriptively measured the universal accessibility of “accessible” fitness and recreational facilities for Ontarians living with mobility disabilities.

by Kelly P. Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Faculty of Department of Kinesiology, Centre for Health Promotion and Rehabilitation, McMaster University, Kathleen A. Martin Ginis, Faculty, Department of Kinesiology, Centre for Health Promotion and Rehabilitation, McMaster University



published January 01, 2011

Box plots of the accessibility ratings

This study descriptively measured the universal accessibility of “accessible” fitness and recreational facilities for Ontarians living with mobility disabilities. The physical and social environments of 44 fitness and recreational facilities that identified as “accessible” were assessed using a modified version of the AIMFREE. None of the 44 facilities were completely accessible. Mean accessibility ratings ranged between 31 and 63 out of a possible 100. Overall, recreational facilities had higher accessibility scores than fitness centers, with significant differences found on professional support and training, entrance areas, and parking lot. A modest correlation was found between the availability of fitness programming and the overall accessibility of fitness-center specific facility areas. Overall, the physical and social environments of the 44 fitness and recreational facilities assessed were limited in their accessibility for persons with mobility disabilities. Future efforts should be directed at establishing and meeting universal accessibility guidelines for Canadian physical activity facilities.

About the Authors

My research program is theory-driven and scientifically rigorous, using both qualitative and quantitative research methods, to measure, understand, and change physical activity behaviour in children, youth, and adults with chronic disabilities. My research focus and objectives stem from the program of research and applied work that I began during my graduate studies, and extended during my Postdoctoral Fellowship, where I examined theory-based, physical activity determinants and interventions in persons with spinal cord injury and schizophrenia. This research inspired me to develop a program of research that examines the utility of theory-based, knowledge mobilization research for promoting psychosocial health and physical activity participation within individuals living with chronic disabilities.

  • Kathleen A. Martin Ginis
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