filed under: workforce development


Training and Resources for Building Better Trails

Efforts of the National Trails Training Partnership in promoting and coordinating training will be highlighted.

by Stuart Macdonald, Trail Consultant, American Trails, Jerry L. Ricciardo, Associate Professor, Eastern Michigan University

Better training and skills help build more sustainable trails, empower volunteers to be more effective, and help youth develop careers and confidence. This session will present educational opportunities, training providers, and a wide range of resources for trails and greenways. Efforts of the National Trails Training Partnership in promoting and coordinating training will be highlighted.

View National Trails Training Partnership Presentation Online

View Trail Engineering Presentation Online

View Backpacking Class Presentation Online

About the Authors

Stuart Macdonald spent 19 years as Colorado's State Trails Coordinator. He is the editor of American Trails Magazine. During 1998-99, he represented State Trail Administrators on the national committee that proposed regulations for accessible trails. He chaired the National Recreational Trails Committee, which advised the Federal Highway Administration in the first years of the Recreational Trails Program. Stuart grew up in San Diego and his main outdoor interest besides trails is surfing. He has a BA in English from San Francisco State and a Masters in Landscape Architecture from Utah State.

Jerry L. Ricciardo served in the U.S. military from 1965 to 1968 and was employed by the U.S.Forest Service as a Forest Technician and Forester. He served as coordinator of the Park & Recreation Management program at Eastern Michigan University where he teaches the history and philosophy of leisure and outdoor recreation; site planning, analysis, design, and rehabilitation; and the use of research design and statistics to manage park and recreation programs. Recent research topics have been leisure resourcefulness and life satisfaction, recreation specialization and life satisfaction. His hobbies include camping, backpacking, and canoeing.

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