Trail Design for Small Properties

Trail Design for Small Properties provides simple, inexpensive solutions for designing, building, and maintaining sustainable trials—trails for hiking, horseback riding, bicycling, cross-country skiing, snowmobiling, off-highway motorcycles (OHMs), and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs).


Trail Design for Small Properties


Written by Mel Baughman and Terry Serres
Published by University of Minnesota Extension

If designed with sustainability in mind, a recreational trail can provide years of enjoyment. Sustainable trails require minimal maintenance because their design and materials hold up to intensive recreational use and severe weather conditions.

What kind of tread material is best for your trail? Do you need a bridge to cross open water or will stepping stones do? What tools do you need? We answer these questions and more, providing the information you need to make the right choices for your trail.

Published September 19, 2006

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