filed under: conservation


The Blue Mountains, Australia

A place to keep people on their feet

The Blue Mountains in Australia is a UNESCO World Heritage Area and one of Australia’s prime natural wonders

Speaker: Scott Colefax, Senior Field Officer, New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service

The Blue Mountains in Australia is a UNESCO World Heritage Area and one of Australia’s prime natural wonders. It was, is, and hopefully always will be a mecca for bushwalking. Some of Australia’s oldest walking tracks are here in an extensive and historic network leading people into wild canyons and inspiring wilderness. Whilst millions get their boots on, load their packs and head out for adventure, a small, dedicated team of walking track specialists is busy working out how to protect the precious past whilst maintaining opportunities for present and future generations. The story of how old tracks are looked after and loved in the Blue Mountains is of interest for anyone who has ever grappled with how to make old tracks new - or how not to make old tracks new.

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