Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plans (SCORPs)

SCORPs are required for a state to receive LWCF funds.

The Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) serves as a guide for all public outdoor recreation in urban and rural neighborhoods, cities, and regions for a given state. Each state must prepare a SCORP every five years to be eligible for funding from the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

by American Trails Staff

The Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) serves as a guide for all public outdoor recreation in urban and rural neighborhoods, cities, and regions for a given state. Each state must prepare a SCORP every five years to be eligible for funding from the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

A SCORP's Key Objectives

The SCORP attempts to bring together the wants and needs of the recreation users and providers into a single, comprehensive document. Arizona’s 2018 SCORP summarizes the objectives of the SCORP as follows:

  • Establish outdoor recreation priorities.
  • Set evaluation criteria to allocate the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF)
    grants.
  • Protect, conserve, and manage public lands, recreation spaces, and unique
    places for current and future generations.
  • Encourage a highly integrated and connected outdoor recreation system.
  • Ensure a diverse and growing population has access to outdoor recreation spaces and opportunities to enjoy a range of recreation activities.
  • Communicate linkages between outdoor recreation, individual wellness benefits, community health, and a thriving economy.
  • Elevate public participation and engagement in outdoor recreation planning initiatives and issues.

Example SCORPs

Colorado 2019-2013

New York 2014-2019

Wyoming 2019-2023

Arizona 2018-2022


Examples from all 50 States

The Society of Outdoor Recreation Professionals provides SCORPs for all 50 states.

Attached document published January 2019

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1,452 views • posted 01/12/2019