filed under: trails as transportation


Something for Nothing, Something for Everyone

Introducing the Tri-Modal Leisure Corridor

Some of America’s most exciting and interesting trail destinations are hidden in plain sight, unrecognized by the communities that they link, often with existing infrastructure.

Speakers: Dave Lemberg, Associate Professor, Department of Geography, Western Michigan University; Virginia “Ginny” Sullivan, Director of Travel Initiatives, Adventure Cycling Association; James Lewis, Associate Professor, Department of Human Performance and Health Education, Western Michigan University

Some of America’s most exciting and interesting trail destinations are hidden in plain sight, unrecognized by the communities that they link, often with existing infrastructure. Tri-Modal Leisure Corridors (TMLC’s) combine roads (for cars) and rail, parallel non-motorized routes (for cyclists and hikers), and parallel navigable waterways (for paddlers) – something for all ages and all interests. Around Lake Michigan for example, the existing Lake Michigan Circle Tour, along with existing and proposed U.S. Bicycle Routes and the growing Lake Michigan National Recreation Water Trail, will combine to form a loop TMLC more than 1,000 miles long. Learn how to recognize, plan, and map your TMLC.

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More Articles in this Category

Earmarks are an Opportunity for Trail Funding

The reemergence of earmarks in the infrastructure and appropriations process in Congress is creating huge opportunity for trail projects that are ready to go.

PedNet is Making a Difference on the Ground in Missouri

American Trails contributor Josh Adams recently interviewed Lawrence Simonson, who serves as the Chief Strategy Officer of the PedNet Coalition, to talk pedestrian safety, projects and obstacles, and making a difference in Missouri.

Strategic Agenda for Pedestrian and Bicycle Transportation

The 2016-2021 Strategic Agenda for Pedestrian and Bicycle Transportation builds on 25 years of progress toward increasing walking and biking safety and activity throughout the United States. The 1994 National Bicycling and Walking Study: Transportation Choices for Changing America set the stage for advancing safe, accessible, comfortable, and well-used pedestrian and bicycle transportation networks, with a focus on increasing trips and reducing injuries and fatalities.

Bike Network Mapping Idea Book

This resource highlights ways that different communities have mapped their existing and proposed bicycle networks. It shows examples of maps at different scales, while also demonstrating a range of mapping strategies, techniques, and approaches. Facility types represented on the respective maps and legends are each different because they represent a community’s unique context and needs.