Something for Nothing, Something for Everyone

Introducing the Tri-Modal Leisure Corridor

Some of America’s most exciting and interesting trail destinations are hidden in plain sight, unrecognized by the communities that they link, often with existing infrastructure.

Speakers: Dave Lemberg, Associate Professor, Department of Geography, Western Michigan University; Virginia “Ginny” Sullivan, Director of Travel Initiatives, Adventure Cycling Association; James Lewis, Associate Professor, Department of Human Performance and Health Education, Western Michigan University

Some of America’s most exciting and interesting trail destinations are hidden in plain sight, unrecognized by the communities that they link, often with existing infrastructure. Tri-Modal Leisure Corridors (TMLC’s) combine roads (for cars) and rail, parallel non-motorized routes (for cyclists and hikers), and parallel navigable waterways (for paddlers) – something for all ages and all interests. Around Lake Michigan for example, the existing Lake Michigan Circle Tour, along with existing and proposed U.S. Bicycle Routes and the growing Lake Michigan National Recreation Water Trail, will combine to form a loop TMLC more than 1,000 miles long. Learn how to recognize, plan, and map your TMLC.

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