"Share the Trail"

Link to Arizona State Parks & Trails

Understanding Shared-Use Trail Etiquette can make Hiking, Biking, and Riding Trails More Enjoyable for Everyone

by Arizona State Parks and Trails, State Trails Coordinator

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If you’re headed out on one of Arizona State Parks and Trails many shared-use trails, it’s important that you understand trail etiquette — and share your knowledge with others. Good trail management combined with user education means a better time for everyone who uses Arizona’s trails. Not all trails are shared use; some are only for hikers, for example, but when you head out, please practice these principles. If you’re taking a first-timer out, whether it’s hiking, mountain biking, or horseback riding, it’s your responsibility to teach them. Someone educated you, so please pass it on.

About the Author


Managing and conserving Arizona's natural, cultural and recreational resources for the benefit of the people, both in our Parks and through our Partners.

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