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posted Dec 29, 2023

Hiking Trails in America

by American Hiking Society

Call it walking. Call it hiking. Seldom has something so much fun also turned out to be so good for us!


posted Jul 15, 2022

A Review and Synthesis of Recreation Ecology Research Findings on Visitor Impacts to Wilderness and Protected Natural Areas

This article examines the recreation ecology literature most relevant to wilderness and backcountry, with a focus on visitor impacts to vegetation, soil, wildlife, and water resources.


posted Jul 15, 2022

A Review and Synthesis of Recreation Ecology Research Supporting Carrying Capacity and Visitor Use Management Decisionmaking

This article reviews the most recent and relevant recreation ecology studies that have been applied in wildland settings to avoid or minimize resource impacts.


posted Jul 28, 2020

I Heart Trails Tourism Strategy

While not traditionally viewed as attractions that contribute to tourism and local economies, trails have become destination worthy sites and formidable economic generators. Trails and tourism have become intertwined to the benefit of communities, small businesses, and points of interest.


posted Jan 22, 2024

STEP IT UP! The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Promote Walking and Walkable Communities

The Call to Action provides strategies that communities can use to support walking, which we hope will result in long-lasting changes to improve the health and health care of Americans today and of the generations that follow.


posted Aug 7, 2020

Environmental Impacts from Mtn Bicycles, Electric Mtn Bicycles, & Motorcycles

by International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA)

In the fall of 2015, under contract with the Bicycle Product Suppliers Association (BPSA), with counsel from a field of recreation management experts, and through a review of existing studies of erosional impacts from trail users, the International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA) conducted a scientifically controlled field study.


posted Mar 6, 2019

2022 Economic Contribution of Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation in Colorado

by Colorado Off Highway Vehicle Coalition

During the 2014–2015 season, motorized recreational enthusiasts spent an estimated $1.6 billion while taking trips using motorized vehicles for recreational purposes. More than 92 percent of these expenditures occurred during the summer recreational season. In addition to spending money on trips, households that participate in motorized recreation also spend money on maintenance, repairs, accessories, vehicle storage, and miscellaneous items associated with their vehicles. Motorized recreational enthusiasts spent more than an estimated $724 million annually on various items to support and enhance their experiences in Colorado, including $163 million in new vehicle purchases. In total, motorized recreational enthusiasts were responsible for $2.3 billion in direct expenditures related to motorized recreation in Colorado during the 2014–2015 season.


posted Mar 16, 2018

Trail Towns: Creating Memorable Destinations for Trail Users

Enhancing communities to benefit more from trail tourism along the Great Allegheny Passage in Pennsylvania and Maryland.


posted Mar 13, 2018

Bicyclists Bring Business Workshop Report

by Parks and Trails New York

A summary of the study from a 2015 workshop.


posted Jun 9, 2020

The Economic Impact of Greenways and Multi-Use Trails

A review of literature prepared as part of the Naugatuck River Greenway Economic Impact Study August, 2015


posted May 1, 2019

An Economic Argument for Water Trails

by River Management Society

This report is a summary of findings from existing studies, which provide examples of the economic impact of water trails in their respective communities. It is meant to provide a helpful resource to communities interested in learning about the economic benefit water trails have provided for cities and towns in the US.


posted Jul 28, 2020

Assessing the Economic and Livability Value of Multi-Use Trails

Multi-use trails are becoming an economic catalyst and vital contributor to the quality of life for communities all across the nation. This document looks at key factors as to why this is, and takes these factors as a basis into a case study on the Tammany Trace (the ‘Trace’), a 31- mile rail-to-trail conversion in St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana.