Recommended Resources

More Resources


Sort: Most Viewed Date Published Title

published Mar 2022

Universal Access Trails and Shared Use Paths

by Larry Knutson with Penn Trails LLC

How can trail groups, local governments, and land trusts responsibly plan, develop, and operate trails that are accessible by all people, including those with limited mobility? What are best management practices? What is legally required? When is universal accessibility not appropriate?


published Jan 2011

Universal Accessibility of "Accessible" Fitness and Recreational Facilities for Persons With Mobility Disabilities

by Kelly P. Arbour-Nicitopoulos with McMaster University, Kathleen A. Martin Ginis with McMaster University

This study descriptively measured the universal accessibility of “accessible” fitness and recreational facilities for Ontarians living with mobility disabilities.


published Jul 2017

Unpaved Non-Motorized Trail Guidelines

by Florida Office of Greenways and Trails

We all know a good trail when we’re on one. We’re not disoriented due to lack of signage or markers. We’re not climbing over downed trees or ducking under branches, and we’re not slogging through water or mud unless we’ve been forewarned beforehand. A good trail is one where we can fully enjoy our surroundings while challenging ourselves if that is our intent. Trails should provide for a variety of trail distances, loops, ecosystems, scenery and degrees of difficulty. As trail professionals, we should strive to make the best possible experience for users and learn from the past.


published Jan 2003

USDA Forest Service Agreements Desk Guide

The Forest Service has a tradition of partnership as old as the Service itself. In the broad sense, partnership denotes sharing a common interest with the Forest Service in National Forest values and a relationship in pursuit of those common interests. Please keep in mind that this is just a guide. It is not meant to replace, supersede or compete with FSM 1580 or FSH 1509.11. The guide provides direction to reference sources. It also may alleviate research, but not eliminate it. Its biggest value may be in helping develop creative thinking about partnerships and what is possible within the authorities now in place. The information provided in this Desk Guide is current up to its 2003 date of publication, but keep in mind that like everything else things change, so always refer back to the appropriate FSM or FSH for any updates to agreement provisions and direction.


published Apr 2014

Use and Nonuse of a Rail Trail Conversion for Physical Activity: Implications for Promoting Trail Use

The purpose was to examine 9 adult activity settings in 25 community parks to determine the most and least frequently used by gender, physical-activity (PA) intensity, and ethnicity.


published Aug 2003

Used Steel Well Casings Make Better Culverts

The next time you need some culverts on your trail try used steel casings. You'll like them!


Jun 3, 2021

Using Interactive Maps to Engage Trail Users

Sponsored by Elebase. Learn how digital interactive mapping can help improve engagement with trail users and stakeholders.


May 20, 2021

Using Signage to Turn Your Trail into a Destination

Learn how to leverage a new or existing trail(s) to increase its exposure and increase visitation.


posted Jul 6, 2022

Using Technology to Promote Recreation

This session will showcase how you can utilize technology to promote your latest trail or trail project.


Oct 15, 2020

Using Volunteers to Maintain Trails in Parks

Learn the ins and out of developing a program by establishing trust and delegating to a volunteer leader so an employee can manage the project.


posted Jul 6, 2022

Utilizing Apps: Introducing Mobile Technology to the Great Outdoors

by Ryan Branciforte with OuterSpatial, Mark DeCracker with Trail Works, Inc., Jeremy Wimpey, Ph.D. with Applied Trails Research, Thomas Dunne

By incorporating mobile technology both Trailhead Labs and OnCell hope to expand our community's curiosity and sense of adventure.


published Jan 2010

Valuing Bicycling’s Economic and Health Impacts in Wisconsin

The results of this study demonstrate that bicycling has the potential to contribute substantially to the health and economic well being of Wisconsin citizens.