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published Jun 2011

Sustainable Trails: More Than Maintenance

by Karen Umphress with UP! Outside

So what makes a trail wholly sustainable? According to Tom Crimmins there are four keys aspects: Resource Sustainability, Economic Sustainability, Experience Sustainability, and Political Sustainability


published Aug 2020

Hank Aaron State Trail Art Concept Plan

The Friends of Hank Aaron State Trail commissioned this Art Concept Plan to lay the groundwork for the placement of public art along the Trail. This Plan identifies sites in which art could most effectively be placed, establishes principles for its placement, and explores how art can go beyond familiar conventions to reinforce the identity of the Trail and its surroundings.


posted Jul 6, 2022

Putting the Public Into Public Safety

Strategies and tactics for promoting safety on urban trails.


published Jun 2015

Mountain Biking Comes to Town

by International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA), Southern Off-Road Bicycle Association

Bike parks are not trails. They are managed similarly to city parks. They require a higher standard of care. They need to be professionally designed and constructed.


posted Jul 6, 2022

Preserving our Nation's Historic Trails

This panel presentation describes the cooperative efforts of a trail mix of organization volunteers, contractors, and agencies, including the latest processes and techniques used in protecting and preserving the crown jewels of the National Trails System.


posted Jul 6, 2022

Applying the Sustainable Trail Design Rules in the Real World

Five rules of sustainable trail design.


posted Jul 6, 2022

Designing Shared-Use Trails to Include Equestrians

by Anne M. O’Dell

A presentation on consideration for shared-use trails involving equestrians.


published Mar 2018

Case Studies in Realizing Co-Benefits of Multimodal Roadway Design and Gray and Green Infrastructure

by Federal Highway Administration

This document highlights case studies of projects that contribute to safe and connected pedestrian and bicycle networks in States and communities throughout the U.S., while at the same time providing resiliency and green infrastructure benefits that promote resiliency and relieve burdens on stormwater systems.


posted Jul 6, 2022

Regional Trails as the Spine of a Small Town and Rural Active Transportation Networks

by Richard Allen with Frontenac County, Ontario, Mike Rose with Alta Planning + Design, Ezra Lipton with Alta Planning + Design

Trails have the opportunity to seamlessly connect vast regions. They become the spine of an active transportation network, that connects people to areas beyond the trail’s reach.


published Sep 2018

Outdoor Recreation Satellite Account: Updated Statistics for 2012-2016

Updated statistics from the Outdoor Recreation Satellite Account (ORSA) released by the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) show that the outdoor recreation economy accounted for 2.2 percent ($412 billion) of current-dollar GDP in 2016 (table 2). In data produced for the first time, using inflation-adjusted (real) GDP, the outdoor recreation economy grew 1.7 percent in 2016, faster than the 1.6 percent growth for the overall U.S. economy (table 6). In addition, real gross output, compensation, and employment all grew faster in outdoor recreation than in the overall economy in 2016.


posted Jul 6, 2022

Telling the Tale of Our Ohio Trails

The nation’s longest paved trail network is a 340-mile accomplishment and a point of pride in Ohio.


published Aug 2010

Oregon, California, Mormon Pioneer, and Pony Express National Historic Trails Long-Range Interpretive Plan

by National Park Service

This plan provides broad-based policies, guidelines, and standards for administering the four trails to ensure the protection of trail resources, their interpretation, and their continued use. Subsequent planning efforts tier off of the Comprehensive Management and Use Plan and provide more detailed recommendations and guidance. Among the many recommendations in the Comprehensive Management and Use Plan is one calling for a trails-wide interpretive plan.