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published Dec 1999

Oregon, California, Mormon Pioneer, and Pony Express National Historic Trails Comprehensive Management and Use Plan / Final Environmental Impact Statement

by National Park Service

This Comprehensive Management and Use Plan / Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Oregon, California, Mormon Pioneer, and Pony Express National Historic Trails is shaped, in part, by the planning requirements found in section 5(f) of the National Trails System Act. It focuses on the trails’ purpose and significance, issues and concerns related to current conditions along the trails, resource protection, visitor experience and use, and long-term administrative and management objectives. Elements of the proposed plan have been developed in cooperation with federal, state, and local agencies, as well as nonprofit trails organizations — the entities that form the core of any partnership for national historic trails.


published Sep 2014

Ashuwilticook Rail Trail Abutter Survey

This survey will not only aid Trail managers and local officials in managing the existing trail and its users, but aid future planners in locating and designing trails that maximize benefits while reducing impacts.


published Dec 2014

Appalachian National Scenic Trail Foundation Document

by National Park Service

The core components of this foundation document include a brief description of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail, the nature and purposes of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail, significance statements, fundamental resources and values, and interpretive themes. These components are core because they typically do not change over time. Core components are expected to be used in future planning and management efforts.


posted Jul 6, 2022

My Two Cents – Innovative Trail Funding Proposal for States and Localities

by Chris Gensic with City of Charlottesville Parks & Recreation

Lack of funding for trail design, construction, and upkeep is often a major barrier to implementation. Topics of discussion include: should this be local or state level, should it fund planning or construction, how much is enough but not too much, and how to equitably share the funding.


published Jan 1999

Economic Benefits of Parks and Open Space

This casebook presents data and examples that can help leaders and concerned citizens make the economic case for parks and open space conservation.


posted Jul 6, 2022

Why Water Trails?

by Sarah Hippensteel Hall, Phd with Miami Conservancy District, Lelia Mellen with National Park Service, Douglas Leed with Ohio Department of Natural Resources

How to connect economics with tourism.


published Jan 2014

Strategy and Plan of Action for The Water Trails Community

Water trails are a unique form of recreation – in its simplest form it consists of floating with minor balance and navigation. However, the ability to reach the water’s edge is probably one of the largest obstacles to participation.


published Jan 1986

Anatomy of Backcountry Management Costs

by USDA Forest Service

A 1986 study from the USFS on backcountry management costs.


published Sep 2018

Wildlife And Trails Primer - Part E. The importance of streamside areas

by American Trails Staff

By understanding the relative quality of riparian areas, it may be possible to find places within the riparian zone for trails that will have less impact on wildlife.


published Sep 2001

How's Business on the Katy Trail? Entreprenuers See Opportunities.

An influx of tourists would mean an economic boom for the small towns along the Katy. But merchants' outlooks vary widely.


published Dec 2013

Mountain Bike Trails Concept Plan for Moose River Plains Wild Forest

by IMBA Trail Solutions

IMBA Trail Solutions visited the Moose River Plains Wild Forest for one week in October of 2013 to conduct field research, meet with stakeholders, and to begin the process of developing a conceptual design for mountain bike use in the area. All of the designs presented in this report are conceptual in nature and have not been completely field verified. Additional work will need to be done in the field to finalize the designs of reroutes and proposed trails described in this report.