Recommended Resources

More Resources


Sort: Most Viewed Date Published Title

published Dec 2011

Making the Trail Visible and Visitor Ready: A Plan for the James River Segment

by National Park Service

The Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail joined the National Trails System following designation by Congress in 2006. The trail helps visitors experience, envision, understand, and protect what the explorers and inhabitants of the region encountered 400 years ago.


published Nov 2011

Porous asphalt shows advantages for trail surfacing

by Stuart Macdonald

A Wisconsin community sees benefits in a different mix of asphalt.


published Oct 2011

FAQ: Effect of Boardwalks on Vegetation and Wildlife

by American Trails Staff

Reducing impacts to vegetation and wildlife under boardwalks


published Sep 2011

San Jose Trail Count Shows Trail Use Continues to Rise

The San Jose trail count provides data to support further development of the integrated trail network.


published Sep 2011

Economic & Health Benefits of Bicycling in Iowa

by Iowa Bicycle Coalition

This study identifies the economic and health impacts of bicycling in Iowa.


published Sep 2011

Ski Trail Grooming Guide

by NWT Recreation and Parks Assn.

NWT communties are connected by countless numbers of trails, though few of them are dedicated ski trails. With a little work, some equipment and know-how, ski doo trails, walking trails, cutlines, riverbeds, fields and lakes can be turned into quality ski trails. And it’s well worth the effort. Groomed and tracked ski trails are easier to ski on, easier to learn on, better to race on and a whole lot faster than bush trails. Groomed trails turn skiing into skiing!


published Aug 2011

Better Bikeways β€” Innovative Facilities For Safer Bicycling in California

by Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC)

Bicycling has exploded around California as people rediscover this enjoyable, healthy, convenient, environmentally friendly and inexpensive way to get around. Many communities are working to create bicycle networks to encourage further increases in bicycling and attract new riders, especially in urban areas. Toward that end, some cities β€” drawing from successful international models β€” have experimented with a variety of innovative bicycle facilities not even imagined a decade ago.


published Jul 2011

Development of Trails along Canals, Flood Channels, and other Waterways

by Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC)

Shared-use pathways along the banks of irrigation canals, flood channels, and other waterways can serve important recreational and transportation functions. The easy grade, scenic interest, and minimal road crossings make shared-use paths along waterways highly attractive as trails for recreation, transportation, and a healthy, active lifestyle, particularly in urbanized areas.


published Jun 2011

Conservation Corps Project Analysis, Fall 2012

by National Park Service

The National Park Service (NPS) Park Facility Maintenance Division (PFMD) conducted a project analysis to determine how the costs of engaging a conservation corps to accomplish cyclic maintenance activities at national parks compared with the costs of using contractor or NPS crews.


published Jun 2011

Merrymeeting Trail Feasibility Study

by Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc.

This feasibility study examined the development of a multi-use rail with trail along the State-owned railroad, as well as a number of alternate routes. This study does not recommend specific routes, but highlights the possibilities for further consideration by the involved individuals and communities.


published Jun 2011

Billings, Montana Trail Asset Management Plan

by Yellowstone County Metropolitan Planning Organization

Billings has successfully implemented over 35 miles of trail in the last 15 years, causing concern over how the trails will be maintained, which departments are responsible for maintenance, and how it will be funded.


published Jun 2011

Bicycle-Rail Trip Analysis and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Focused Study

by Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority

The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) recently began studying the ways in which bicycling, for transportation and in combination with transit, can reduce automobile use and lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The first of these focused studies concentrated on the Metro Orange Line and parallel bicycle path. This Bicycle Rail Trip Analysis and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Study looks more broadly at bicycle trips to and from Metro Rail. The purpose of this study is to establish the benefits of providing an integrated transportation system where bicyclists are accommodated at train stations and on trains.